Rolls Royce Phantom Review,Features,Specifications & Price In Bangalore

OVERVIEW ;

The Rolls-Royce Phantom is offered as a Phantom sedan, the Phantom Coupe, the Drophead Coupe (convertible), and the Phantom extended wheelbase sedan (EWB). All four body styles use the same 453-hp, 531-lb-ft of torque V-12 mated to an eight-speed automatic. All four body styles are rear-wheel drive and deliver the same EPA-rated fuel economy numbers, 11/19 mpg city/highway. Rolls-Royce claims that these nearly 6,000-pound behemoths can hit 60 mph in 5.6 seconds for the Phantom Coupe and Drophead Coupe, and 5.7 seconds for the Phantom sedan and Phantom EWB. Get detail features, specs and price of Rolls Royce Cars in Carzprice

The Rolls-Royce Phantom is one of the most customizable vehicles on the market; the automaker claims there are over 44,000 hues to choose from. Once you choose from the almost endless exterior and interior color and style combinations, you can have your door sills, glove box lid, and headrests customized with the text of your choice. Your Phantom’s Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament can be gold plated, in solid silver, or illuminated. When you are done choosing from a host of different veneers, Rolls-Royce offers some of the most luxurious options in the industry: a humidor in the glove box, an electric rear curtain, lambswool floor mats, a small refrigerator that holds two champagne bottles, milled aluminum cup holders, and a cabinet to hold your glassware. Once you are ready to exit from the lap of luxury, Rolls-Royce has you covered with more luxurious options: a beautifully handcrafted picnic basket, portable leather trimmed insulated bag, leather-trimmed luggage compartment, wooden luggage compartment floor, a six-piece handmade luggage set, and a bumper protection apron.

DESIGN AND STYLE ;

In what would be typical of a facelift from other manufacturers, what we see with the Phantom VIII is a lot of the same, but plenty of new at the same time. Overall, the car still has the same generally boxy design and, if you were to look at just a silhouette of the VII next to the VIII, you wouldn’t be able to spot the difference. But, what’s important to remember here is that the little subtleties make all the difference. Rolls took the time to construct the aluminum body in a way that closes the gap at the seams as much as possible, with the only noticeable gaps in the body resulting from the doors themselves. All other seams between body parts have a clearance so tight that you can’t see them at a glance or have been integrated in such a way that you can’t tell they are there. The other big note on this front is the way the grille is now integrated into the nose. Instead of being a separate unit, it’s part of the front fascia.

To the untrained eye, the front end might not look all that different, but there’s actually a lot going on here. First off, those two central vents below the grille have been replaced by a slightly recessed area for the front license plate, while the air dam and corner vents are all now one big piece with a honeycomb mesh for extra character. Those weird horizontal driving lights from the outgoing model have also disappeared and in their place is a smaller set of vents, one on each corner, that provides a look of depth and some mild aggressiveness – something that could attract the younger wealthy crowd. As we move higher in the front end, you’ll notice that the nose itself sits higher, raising the Spirit of Ecstacy emblem higher than on the outgoing model. The headlights are smaller and sleeker than before, and also recessed into the fascia by a couple of inches. Inside, them, you’ll find integrated LED running lights as well as the “most advanced” laser headlight system that is said to project light nearly 2,000 feet down the road, illuminating even the darkest of nights. Finally, the sharp body lines of the hood have been moved further inward, and the hood has a taller presence, really accenting the new grille quite nicely.

Moving over to the side profile, the changes are a lot less obvious, but they are there. For instance, the slope to the rear end, where the rear windscreen is, is designed at a larger angle, which should make it a little more aerodynamic. You can’t even make out the fuel filler door in the C-Pillar, and the stationary glass behind the rear door is now a bit larger at the bottom with rounded corners. The chrome trim here has also grown a bit wider, and matches the door handles, but isn’t all the gaudy, really. The lower half of the body did actually change quite a bit. For instance, those dramatic body lines below the belt line have been smoothed out and are barely visible. This adds a bit of mystery to the side, but also gives a sense of cleanliness. Further down, the side skirts are now the same height from front to rear, and a gentle body line runs from the front wheel well toward the rear, where it blends into the body just past the central door seam. The wheel wells are also significantly toned down, now featuring just a light defining the line at the top. It’s a very attractive look, indeed.

Around back, you’ll find even more changes. As you can see, the rear quarters are bubblier than before and don’t sit quite as far below the rear deck. And, because of the unique angle of the rear glass, it’s also got a slight curvature to it while to rounded corners of the top adds just a bit of extra character. The license place recess is now a bit deeper in the deck lid, while the chrome trim above has grown a bit to overlap the recess and takes on a 3D look – it’s a nice touch really. Down below, the rounded rear fascia and slightly concave corners are the only character to speak of aside from the chrome trim that sits just below the deck lid. The exhaust outlets haven’t changed in shape but look to be just a bit wider. Finally, the most important change here is the taillights. Those old, dated units of the Series II VII are long gone and have been replaced by sleeker modernized units that feature an all-new matrix. The taillight portion is made up of the outermost edges, while the inner portion is reserved for brake light functions. In the center of each sits a tiny LED reverse light to go with the Rolls-Royce emblem in the center. Get On Road price of Rolls Royce Phantom from Rolls Royce Dealers in Bangalore at Carzprice

CABIN AND COMFORT ;

Rolls-Royce’s signature ‘coach doors’ or rear doors hinged at the back, open wide for easy access into a cabin that is truly fit for a king. Seated in the rear, I shut the electrically operated doors with the touch of a button (the chauffer can do it from the outside as well) to hermetically seal me off from the outside world.You can spend the whole day inside a Phantom just soaking up the unadulterated luxury oozing out of every pore. There’s richness in every small detail; right from the deep-pile carpets, the exquisitely stitched leather trim and fine-grain wood, to the soft leather seats with the feather-filled headrests. Seat comfort is something you won’t complain about even in the standard-wheelbase Phantom, which has an abundance of legroom, while the extended version has an excess of it to the point that I can sit with my legs fully stretched-out. You sit nice and high in the sumptuous rear seats, which can be amply reclined. The sofa-like seats will heat or cool your backside and even massage you. This latter function is what I discovered accidentally and in the process also exposed a minor design flaw.

My knee would knock a button on the switch panel on the door, which inadvertently activated the massage function. This kept happening a couple of times which made me wonder why the cluster of switches couldn’t have been moved forward. Koehn has received this feedback and is well aware that the switch placement, directly in line with a passenger’s knee, is not optimal but says. “Moving it forward would make passengers stretch to reach them.” And that’s when you realise how much thought has gone into making the switchgear fall easily to hand. You don’t have to stretch or bend to reach any of the switches (and crease your suit or gown by doing so) but simply sit back, close the doors via the button on the C-pillar, and activate the air con, stereo and all the seat functions via the rotary dial cluster in the centre console of the arm rest. Even the small table and individual entertainment screens flip down with press of an easily accessible button. The switches themselves are wonderfully damped, as are the traditional organ-stop plungers that control the air flow. You also get a coolbox complete with a pair of champagne flutes.

Upfront, the seats aren’t as lavish as the back but they are hugely comfortable and come with a wide range of adjustments. For the first time on a Rolls, the front doors too can be electrically closed with the touch of a button, which relieves the front occupants from the undignified task of stretching out for the door handle. The Y-spoke steering wheel is as massive as ever but now comes with a plethora of buttons. Also giving a nod to modernity is the digital instrument cluster, which replace the analogue dials, and a heads-up display for the driver.The ‘starlight’ roof is a special Rolls-Royce feature that only covered half of the roof in the previous phantom, but now on the new car it runs all the way to back. The extended Phantom has a whopping 1,344 fibre optic lights randomly scattered in the headliner. The electrical architecture allows each of these lights to be individually controlled, allowing Rolls-Royce to give you your own customised constellation! But while Rolls-Royce can promise you the stars, it can’t give you the sun or the moon. There is no sunroof, not even as an option, in the new Phantom.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION ;

All four variants of this coupe series are fitted with a powerful and dynamic 6.7-litre petrol engine, which comes with a displacement capacity of 6749cc. It is integrated with twelve cylinders and provide a power packed performance along with decent acceleration and pick up. This engine has the ability to churn out a whopping power output of 453bhp at 5350rpm in combination with a hammering torque of 720Nm at just 3500rpm, which is rather decent for Indian road and traffic conditions. This powerful and strong engine has been intelligently mated with eight speed automatic transmission gear box, which makes sure that the drive and ride for driver and passengers is smooth and inspiring. This engine makes use of direct fuel injection and is driven by wire design via valvetronic technology.

Its power plant is incorporated with an advanced direct injection fuel supply system, which allows the vehicle to deliver about 4.7 Kmpl in the city traffic conditions. At the same, under standard driving conditions on the bigger roads it gives out 9.5 Kmpl approximately.This powerful 6.7-litre petrol engine has the ability of churning out a maximum power 453bhp at 5350rpm in combination with a peak torque output of 720Nm at just 3500rpm, which is quite good for Indian road and traffic conditions.With the help of an eight speed automatic transmission gear box, this motor allows the vehicle to attain a maximum speed in the range of 240 to 250 Kmph, which is rather incredible for this segment. At the same time, it can cross the speed mark of 100 Kmph in close to 5.9 seconds from standstill that is rather thrilling for the occupants sitting inside.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

The wheel is a tad thicker than before, and there’s fully electric power steering, but the mode of operation remains the same for the chauffeurs among you: slide the delicate little column stalk into ‘D’, apply the merest suggestion of pressure to the throttle pedal, and ease away in such a manner as not to rustle the copy of Pork Belly Futures Digest that’s being mulled over in the rear compartment. Otherwise you’ll be mulling over your P45.And it does actually handle. Or more accurately it can handle, should you elect to lean on it. But even with a (heavily revised) version of Rolls’s 6.6-litre twin-turbo V12 – it’s 6.75 litres in capacity here, and makes 563bhp – it feels inappropriate to trouble the power reserve gauge any more than is strictly necessary (no rev counter in here, of course). Which, given that you’re surfing along on a huge wave of torque, 664lb ft from 1,700rpm, is mostly never.The essence of a Rolls-Royce is a driving – travelling – experience that is beyond even that summoned up by the plushest Mercedes S-Class or BMW 7 Series. You don’t notice things as humdrum as gearchanges (the Phantom uses ZF’s silken eight-speed transmission), and you only notice really awful road surfaces. If you’re in the back, you don’t notice much at all. Which is the point: in a Phantom, silence isn’t just golden, it’s omnipresent.

SAFETY FEATURES ;

Phantom has a unique and advanced body frame which is made of 500 separate parts attached. Each part is made of aluminium which is light and phenomenally strong. Apart from its strong built; Phantom has many other quality features like front airbags, side airbags, overhead airbags, knee airbags, seatbelt pretensions and anti-whiplash system all aiming at giving a better security to the passengers while on the road or in any unfortunate incident.The front and the rear wheels of Phantom have ventilated disc brakes with brake assist and traction control.

BOTTOMLINE ;

Admittedly, I wasn’t too impressed with what we had seen up to the debut. The spy shots and teasers left me really wanting more. But, one has to remember that this is Rolls-Royce we’re talking about and extreme makeovers aren’t exactly its forte. And, while the changes to each segment of the car are far from revolutionary, collectively, the Phantom VIII is a huge improvement over its predecessor. There’s enough new outside to keep it fresh, and the refinement of the interior is more than adequate. Most of the work came into play under the skin, where the supporting bits and pieces really tie the car together as a whole. So, while there isn’t a huge difference between the Phantom VIII and the Phantom VII, there’s enough to keep those wealthy enough to afford one more than happy. You just can’t get luxury like this in too many places, you know? Apply car loan for Rolls Royce Phantom at Carzprice

 

 

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