Hyundai Creta First Drive Review


Hyundai has launched the updated 2017 Creta SUV in India. The updated Creta SUV now gets cosmetic as well equipment upgrade to it. Apart from getting exterior as well as interior update, Hyundai who also happens to India’s second largest car manufacturer has decided to add an exclusive diesel trim in the form of a new Executive variant ‘E+ trim while there is one more trim in the form of SX+ which gets dual tone trim to it.

Unfortunately, Hyundai has decided not to make any changes under the hood and thus this popular SUV still offered with 1.6-litre Dual VTVT petrol, 1.6 Litre CRDi VGT diesel unit and 1.4L CRDI U2 diesel engine options.


From nose to tail the Hyundai Creta has been designed keenly. There’s not a single angle from where it looks disproportionate or bland. The designers have done a fabulous work with the Fluidic Sculpture 2.0, which makes it look like Santa Fe’s younger brother. The lean and aggressive front styling consists of a shiny and wide three-slat grille with the Hyundai badge sitting proudly in the middle. The sleek projector headlights with LED DRLs are the party piece of the front styling. The muscular bumper integrates the faux silver skid plate and vertically stacked foglamps. Just notice how the bonnet runs straight and suddenly cuts flat from the grille, this makes it look like a true blue SUV. Get more details and offers on Hyundai cars in Chennai from Hyundai dealers in Chennai

There is nothing bulbous on the side profile of the Creta, which makes it carry the butch SUV stance from this angle as well. The squarish roofline, sharp and rising crease lines, roof rails, high ground clearance and pronounced wheel arches with black cladding are undoubtedly the ingredients of a full-flavoured SUV. The 5-spoke diamond-cut alloys further add a pinch of premium appearance to the Creta. The sharp shoulder line goes up to the tail lights that carry the crease to the tailgate in a wave pattern making a smart number plate housing, nice touch. With a silver skid plate and dual tone bumper, the Creta looks complete from the rear.


There will be no change in the interior design of the Hyundai Creta 2017. It will continue with the same interior theme. It will however, get new materials. The colour theme will be a new one with black and red theme on certain variants. The upholstery also will be upgraded. The interiors which are already good will be further enhanced. This will make the SUV feel even more premium. Rest of the interiors will be the same. There shall be Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as well on offering with the new Arkamys Sound Mood system.

There are no changes in the seating and space. So, the Creta will continue to have the same space like the current one. Five people can sit comfortably abreast without any constraint for knee room or head room. There is even a rear AC vent that will cool the rear occupants area quicker.

The Hyundai Creta 2017 will see some more features getting added to it. A new infotainment system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto is likely to come. This is the same system we had witnessed in the new Elantra. Hyundai is looking at adding more options on the SUV as and when time passes by. It even has Arkamys Sound Mood system, which comes standard on the S+, SX+, SX+ Dual Tone & SX(O) variants. Then on the inside, the seats now have a black and red upholstery too.


Hyundai’s SUV is powered by a set of engines shared with the Verna – 1.4 and 1.6 diesels and a 1.6 petrol, all of which get a six-speed manual gearbox as standard, though the bigger diesel gets the option of a six-speed auto as well. We managed to drive both the 1.6-litre motors – petrol and diesel – and came away quite impressed. The 1.6-litre diesel engine is smooth, silent and feels very punchy in its band of operation. While its high power output of 126bhp is important, even more important is the healthy torque figure of 26.5kgm; the latter helping with the additional weight of the SUV. There is a fair bit of turbo lag initially and the engine hits its stride only after 1,700rpm, so you do sometimes find yourself needing to shift to a lower gear at times in traffic. Performance after that, however, is strong and overtaking is just a flex of the right foot away. And the Creta is also well-suited to highway use, the punchy midrange and tall gearing working well on open highway roads to deliver plenty of useable performance. So what you want to do with the diesel is stay in the 2,000 to 4,000rpm powerband. What remains a strength of this motor, however, is refinement – it’s smooth and silent at just about any RPM, and even the clutch action is super light.

The gearshifts on the six-speed manual ‘box are positive, with precise and short throws. As for the six-speed automatic on the 1.6 diesel, in normal D mode with a relaxed driving style, it shifts up very early, so progress is relaxed but adequately rapid. Thanks to the torque converter masking the engine’s initial turbo lag, the power delivery is quite linear, making this Hyundai SUV easy to drive. The gearshifts are smooth and remind you that refinement and comfort have been given more priority than ultimate performance. It does help that you can shift gears manually via the gear lever when you need that sudden acceleration for overtaking. Even in this mode, however, it will automatically upshift at the red line, and it’s slow and reluctant to downshift manually. It’s a very old-school slush-box, and for most this should be fine, but if you want to drive quickly, it’s nowhere as good as something more modern – like VW’s DSG dual-clutch unit. Get On Road price of Hyundai Creta from Hyundai Dealers in Hyderabad at Carzprice


The Hyundai Creta with its 17-inch wheels rides like a car twice its price…maybe even better. There is an almost minimal amount of pitching or bounce on large bumps and the Creta even take broken tarmac with relative ease. Of course, chucking it into a corner at higher speeds does take its toll on the overall composure of the car, but more on that a little later.Every Hyundai car in recent times has differentiated itself by being easy to drive. Whether that means a light steering, light clutch or light gearshifts, most Hyundai’s do not tend to give you general fatigue either in the city or on the highway. And the Creta is exactly the same. Being quite a bit larger than the i20, etc, the Creta does not feel large both because of its easy to drive controls and also due to the fact that the large greenhouse offers almost unrestricted views of your surroundings. Of course, having height adjustable steering and a height adjustable driver’s seat also helps.

Being a high riding SUV, one might expected the Creta to handle like a marshmallow. It does not. It isn’t exactly a race car, but Hyundai has clearly worked a lot on the overall suspension settings to tune the Creta’s handling dynamics to suit the general public. Although it does have a fair bit of body roll in long sweeping faster corners, the Creta does feel quite comfortable at highway cruising speeds. Yes, there are other SUVs like the Duster that would outhandle the Creta but as an overall package and especially in the city, The Creta is certainly a more livable package.Coming to the brakes, this is possibly one of the only aspects of the Creta that did disappoint us a little. Its not that the brakes aren’t good enough to stop the car in time, it is just the fact that the pedal does not have any solid feel and feedback to inspire confidence from the get go. Maybe the Creta’s brakes just need getting used to but on a personal level, it definitely needs a bit more bite.


In the Creta, ABS is offered as a standard across all variants. The Creta is a great option for someone looking for a safe car. The top end SX(O) variant is offered with 6 airbags, traction control, Electronic stability program and hill-start assist.The Creta is constructed using advanced high-strength steel and ultra high-strength steel. This keeps the weight low as well as enhances passenger protection in case of a collision. This claim was proved when the Creta (Called the ix25 in China) underwent the C-NCAP (China New Car Assessment Program) and scored a full 5 stars. Point to be noted is that the tests were conducted on the mid-range (S+) variant without curtain airbags.


Hyundai has come up with a smart offering in the compact segment, Creta, which is refreshingly styled. Its outer stance is robust, which makes the SUV look larger than the rivals. Hyundai’s new generation Fluidic Design language convincingly manages to lure lookers. Cabin is designed austerely. Space for passengers on the front and rear is generous, however, the view from rear is a little restricted due to the high window line that makes the seat seem low. The well-equipped cabin and all-essential safety features make Creta a desirable SUV. The powerful engine line-up and a segment-first six-speed auto box on offer (SX+ diesel only) bring Creta a notch above the rivals. Mileage is appreciative and performance on road is good, making Creta a complete package.


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Rolls Royce Phantom Review,Features,Specifications & Price In Bangalore


The Rolls-Royce Phantom is offered as a Phantom sedan, the Phantom Coupe, the Drophead Coupe (convertible), and the Phantom extended wheelbase sedan (EWB). All four body styles use the same 453-hp, 531-lb-ft of torque V-12 mated to an eight-speed automatic. All four body styles are rear-wheel drive and deliver the same EPA-rated fuel economy numbers, 11/19 mpg city/highway. Rolls-Royce claims that these nearly 6,000-pound behemoths can hit 60 mph in 5.6 seconds for the Phantom Coupe and Drophead Coupe, and 5.7 seconds for the Phantom sedan and Phantom EWB. Get detail features, specs and price of Rolls Royce Cars in Carzprice

The Rolls-Royce Phantom is one of the most customizable vehicles on the market; the automaker claims there are over 44,000 hues to choose from. Once you choose from the almost endless exterior and interior color and style combinations, you can have your door sills, glove box lid, and headrests customized with the text of your choice. Your Phantom’s Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament can be gold plated, in solid silver, or illuminated. When you are done choosing from a host of different veneers, Rolls-Royce offers some of the most luxurious options in the industry: a humidor in the glove box, an electric rear curtain, lambswool floor mats, a small refrigerator that holds two champagne bottles, milled aluminum cup holders, and a cabinet to hold your glassware. Once you are ready to exit from the lap of luxury, Rolls-Royce has you covered with more luxurious options: a beautifully handcrafted picnic basket, portable leather trimmed insulated bag, leather-trimmed luggage compartment, wooden luggage compartment floor, a six-piece handmade luggage set, and a bumper protection apron.


In what would be typical of a facelift from other manufacturers, what we see with the Phantom VIII is a lot of the same, but plenty of new at the same time. Overall, the car still has the same generally boxy design and, if you were to look at just a silhouette of the VII next to the VIII, you wouldn’t be able to spot the difference. But, what’s important to remember here is that the little subtleties make all the difference. Rolls took the time to construct the aluminum body in a way that closes the gap at the seams as much as possible, with the only noticeable gaps in the body resulting from the doors themselves. All other seams between body parts have a clearance so tight that you can’t see them at a glance or have been integrated in such a way that you can’t tell they are there. The other big note on this front is the way the grille is now integrated into the nose. Instead of being a separate unit, it’s part of the front fascia.

To the untrained eye, the front end might not look all that different, but there’s actually a lot going on here. First off, those two central vents below the grille have been replaced by a slightly recessed area for the front license plate, while the air dam and corner vents are all now one big piece with a honeycomb mesh for extra character. Those weird horizontal driving lights from the outgoing model have also disappeared and in their place is a smaller set of vents, one on each corner, that provides a look of depth and some mild aggressiveness – something that could attract the younger wealthy crowd. As we move higher in the front end, you’ll notice that the nose itself sits higher, raising the Spirit of Ecstacy emblem higher than on the outgoing model. The headlights are smaller and sleeker than before, and also recessed into the fascia by a couple of inches. Inside, them, you’ll find integrated LED running lights as well as the “most advanced” laser headlight system that is said to project light nearly 2,000 feet down the road, illuminating even the darkest of nights. Finally, the sharp body lines of the hood have been moved further inward, and the hood has a taller presence, really accenting the new grille quite nicely.

Moving over to the side profile, the changes are a lot less obvious, but they are there. For instance, the slope to the rear end, where the rear windscreen is, is designed at a larger angle, which should make it a little more aerodynamic. You can’t even make out the fuel filler door in the C-Pillar, and the stationary glass behind the rear door is now a bit larger at the bottom with rounded corners. The chrome trim here has also grown a bit wider, and matches the door handles, but isn’t all the gaudy, really. The lower half of the body did actually change quite a bit. For instance, those dramatic body lines below the belt line have been smoothed out and are barely visible. This adds a bit of mystery to the side, but also gives a sense of cleanliness. Further down, the side skirts are now the same height from front to rear, and a gentle body line runs from the front wheel well toward the rear, where it blends into the body just past the central door seam. The wheel wells are also significantly toned down, now featuring just a light defining the line at the top. It’s a very attractive look, indeed.

Around back, you’ll find even more changes. As you can see, the rear quarters are bubblier than before and don’t sit quite as far below the rear deck. And, because of the unique angle of the rear glass, it’s also got a slight curvature to it while to rounded corners of the top adds just a bit of extra character. The license place recess is now a bit deeper in the deck lid, while the chrome trim above has grown a bit to overlap the recess and takes on a 3D look – it’s a nice touch really. Down below, the rounded rear fascia and slightly concave corners are the only character to speak of aside from the chrome trim that sits just below the deck lid. The exhaust outlets haven’t changed in shape but look to be just a bit wider. Finally, the most important change here is the taillights. Those old, dated units of the Series II VII are long gone and have been replaced by sleeker modernized units that feature an all-new matrix. The taillight portion is made up of the outermost edges, while the inner portion is reserved for brake light functions. In the center of each sits a tiny LED reverse light to go with the Rolls-Royce emblem in the center. Get On Road price of Rolls Royce Phantom from Rolls Royce Dealers in Bangalore at Carzprice


Rolls-Royce’s signature ‘coach doors’ or rear doors hinged at the back, open wide for easy access into a cabin that is truly fit for a king. Seated in the rear, I shut the electrically operated doors with the touch of a button (the chauffer can do it from the outside as well) to hermetically seal me off from the outside world.You can spend the whole day inside a Phantom just soaking up the unadulterated luxury oozing out of every pore. There’s richness in every small detail; right from the deep-pile carpets, the exquisitely stitched leather trim and fine-grain wood, to the soft leather seats with the feather-filled headrests. Seat comfort is something you won’t complain about even in the standard-wheelbase Phantom, which has an abundance of legroom, while the extended version has an excess of it to the point that I can sit with my legs fully stretched-out. You sit nice and high in the sumptuous rear seats, which can be amply reclined. The sofa-like seats will heat or cool your backside and even massage you. This latter function is what I discovered accidentally and in the process also exposed a minor design flaw.

My knee would knock a button on the switch panel on the door, which inadvertently activated the massage function. This kept happening a couple of times which made me wonder why the cluster of switches couldn’t have been moved forward. Koehn has received this feedback and is well aware that the switch placement, directly in line with a passenger’s knee, is not optimal but says. “Moving it forward would make passengers stretch to reach them.” And that’s when you realise how much thought has gone into making the switchgear fall easily to hand. You don’t have to stretch or bend to reach any of the switches (and crease your suit or gown by doing so) but simply sit back, close the doors via the button on the C-pillar, and activate the air con, stereo and all the seat functions via the rotary dial cluster in the centre console of the arm rest. Even the small table and individual entertainment screens flip down with press of an easily accessible button. The switches themselves are wonderfully damped, as are the traditional organ-stop plungers that control the air flow. You also get a coolbox complete with a pair of champagne flutes.

Upfront, the seats aren’t as lavish as the back but they are hugely comfortable and come with a wide range of adjustments. For the first time on a Rolls, the front doors too can be electrically closed with the touch of a button, which relieves the front occupants from the undignified task of stretching out for the door handle. The Y-spoke steering wheel is as massive as ever but now comes with a plethora of buttons. Also giving a nod to modernity is the digital instrument cluster, which replace the analogue dials, and a heads-up display for the driver.The ‘starlight’ roof is a special Rolls-Royce feature that only covered half of the roof in the previous phantom, but now on the new car it runs all the way to back. The extended Phantom has a whopping 1,344 fibre optic lights randomly scattered in the headliner. The electrical architecture allows each of these lights to be individually controlled, allowing Rolls-Royce to give you your own customised constellation! But while Rolls-Royce can promise you the stars, it can’t give you the sun or the moon. There is no sunroof, not even as an option, in the new Phantom.


All four variants of this coupe series are fitted with a powerful and dynamic 6.7-litre petrol engine, which comes with a displacement capacity of 6749cc. It is integrated with twelve cylinders and provide a power packed performance along with decent acceleration and pick up. This engine has the ability to churn out a whopping power output of 453bhp at 5350rpm in combination with a hammering torque of 720Nm at just 3500rpm, which is rather decent for Indian road and traffic conditions. This powerful and strong engine has been intelligently mated with eight speed automatic transmission gear box, which makes sure that the drive and ride for driver and passengers is smooth and inspiring. This engine makes use of direct fuel injection and is driven by wire design via valvetronic technology.

Its power plant is incorporated with an advanced direct injection fuel supply system, which allows the vehicle to deliver about 4.7 Kmpl in the city traffic conditions. At the same, under standard driving conditions on the bigger roads it gives out 9.5 Kmpl approximately.This powerful 6.7-litre petrol engine has the ability of churning out a maximum power 453bhp at 5350rpm in combination with a peak torque output of 720Nm at just 3500rpm, which is quite good for Indian road and traffic conditions.With the help of an eight speed automatic transmission gear box, this motor allows the vehicle to attain a maximum speed in the range of 240 to 250 Kmph, which is rather incredible for this segment. At the same time, it can cross the speed mark of 100 Kmph in close to 5.9 seconds from standstill that is rather thrilling for the occupants sitting inside.


The wheel is a tad thicker than before, and there’s fully electric power steering, but the mode of operation remains the same for the chauffeurs among you: slide the delicate little column stalk into ‘D’, apply the merest suggestion of pressure to the throttle pedal, and ease away in such a manner as not to rustle the copy of Pork Belly Futures Digest that’s being mulled over in the rear compartment. Otherwise you’ll be mulling over your P45.And it does actually handle. Or more accurately it can handle, should you elect to lean on it. But even with a (heavily revised) version of Rolls’s 6.6-litre twin-turbo V12 – it’s 6.75 litres in capacity here, and makes 563bhp – it feels inappropriate to trouble the power reserve gauge any more than is strictly necessary (no rev counter in here, of course). Which, given that you’re surfing along on a huge wave of torque, 664lb ft from 1,700rpm, is mostly never.The essence of a Rolls-Royce is a driving – travelling – experience that is beyond even that summoned up by the plushest Mercedes S-Class or BMW 7 Series. You don’t notice things as humdrum as gearchanges (the Phantom uses ZF’s silken eight-speed transmission), and you only notice really awful road surfaces. If you’re in the back, you don’t notice much at all. Which is the point: in a Phantom, silence isn’t just golden, it’s omnipresent.


Phantom has a unique and advanced body frame which is made of 500 separate parts attached. Each part is made of aluminium which is light and phenomenally strong. Apart from its strong built; Phantom has many other quality features like front airbags, side airbags, overhead airbags, knee airbags, seatbelt pretensions and anti-whiplash system all aiming at giving a better security to the passengers while on the road or in any unfortunate incident.The front and the rear wheels of Phantom have ventilated disc brakes with brake assist and traction control.


Admittedly, I wasn’t too impressed with what we had seen up to the debut. The spy shots and teasers left me really wanting more. But, one has to remember that this is Rolls-Royce we’re talking about and extreme makeovers aren’t exactly its forte. And, while the changes to each segment of the car are far from revolutionary, collectively, the Phantom VIII is a huge improvement over its predecessor. There’s enough new outside to keep it fresh, and the refinement of the interior is more than adequate. Most of the work came into play under the skin, where the supporting bits and pieces really tie the car together as a whole. So, while there isn’t a huge difference between the Phantom VIII and the Phantom VII, there’s enough to keep those wealthy enough to afford one more than happy. You just can’t get luxury like this in too many places, you know? Apply car loan for Rolls Royce Phantom at Carzprice



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Tata Hexa Specifications,Features & Performance


The Tata Hexa has been a much awaited vehicle from Tata and had the industry talking before its launch. It was earlier shown as a concept at Geneva Motor Show in 2015. The Tata Hexa is one of the successful vehicles from Tata in recent times and has successfully wooed buyers as well, with some intelligent positioning. We review the Tata Hexa in detail and tell you whether it is worth buying. Read further.


Even though it replaces an MPV, the Hexa doesn’t look like one. Tata has given it a muscular and aggressive styling. The bonnet is heavily sculpted, there are smoked out projector headlamps, the grille is wide & highlighted with chrome and the bumper integrates LED daytime running lights. You will notice flared wheel arches on the side profile along with the neat looking 19-inch alloy wheels. These are the biggest wheels available in this segment. The black cladding adds to the rugged appeal of the Hexa.

The side profile might remind you of the Aria with its silhouette but Tata has cleverly reworked some details to cover the MPV proportions. The rear profile gets a heavy dose of chrome on the tail gate with LED tail lights while the bumper gets a skid plate and dual exhaust setup. The tail section might look a tad simple compared to the rest of the styling but it will grow on you with time.


Let’s first talk about what’s changed the least on the inside – the space. It’s a big car so it has a big room, right? Well, not quite. Its beefy body-on-frame construction eats up a lot of space when compared to a similarly-sized SUV with a monocoque chassis. Still, there’s more than ample room for five; it’s just that the last row is best for two people only. Boot space is surprisingly good with all the seats in place; you could get a mid-size suitcase in here, although you will have to haul it high up over the tall sill.

Similarly, access to the cabin is quite a climb up and across the wide door sills. On to the seats, and at the front, you’ll be impressed at how well Tata has crafted the big chairs. The contrast-stitched faux leather feels suitably rich. The cushioning, which uses multi-density foam, is a touch too firm but has the bolstering just where you need it. Our only small grouse is the ‘lump’ around the H-point of the seat which, rather than adding to the support, feels like you’ve sat on your mobile phone. The thick A-pillar can initially cause a blind spot but you learn to look around it. The car’s size and the high driving position can be a little overwhelming until you get used to it.

If you want to replicate the comfort of the front seats in the middle row, you can do so on the top-spec XT trims of the Hexa with its two individual chairs. The only downside of these, apart from reducing the seating capacity to six, is that they don’t tumble forward and this limits maximum boot space; also, it’s easier to just walk between them to access the back row. A conventional split-folding bench comes as standard, but even here, accessing the third row isn’t easy. It has to be slid all the way back to tumble forward properly, and then too its immense weight makes it quite a task. Moreover, the Hexa’s huge rear wheel arches make access tricky, to begin with. Still, when in place, even the bench seat is really comfortable, supportive and spacious, although the middle passenger has a large central AC console to deal with. What does give you that ‘executive’ feeling in the middle row is the window shade that can be raised to keep the heat out quite effectively.

Finally, the third row – it’s quite a comfy place for two. The high floor chassis means you sit a bit knees-up of course, but it’s not as bad as some other ladder-frame SUVs. The advantage of the MPV-like squared-off rear is that head and shoulder room isn’t compromised in the third row. In fact, you can even recline the backrest, and there are also adjustable headrests. There are, of course, air-con vents for all three rows, but the blower is really quite loud, and when fully cranked up it, can overpower even the engine noise.

So, space and comfort are a highlight in the Hexa but you’ll agree that what really wows you about the interior is the quality of materials. It’s on a level thus far unseen from Tata Motors, and for once has a design to match. The dashboard isn’t a dull collection of flat surfaces anymore. The central stack has a variety of colours, textures and surfaces; here too, like with the exterior, excessive chrome has been substituted with other finishes, like piano black and dull grey plastics. Panel gaps are impressively few and even so, the dark colour scheme helps conceal them. The quality of the switchgear is also rather good (there are even knurled knobs and door locks), apart from a few places like the steering control buttons which feel tiny and fiddly to use. The upper glove box also has a terribly tricky-to-use unlock button for its latch.


While the Hexa’s engine has been derived from the 2.2-litre unit seen in the Aria, in its Varicor 400 guise it has been extensively revamped. Girish Wagh, Sr Vice President, Product Planning at Tata Motors, explained that the block, head, intake and turbo systems have been revamped to deliver higher power and torque density and greater levels of refinement. The four-cylinder engine makes 156hp and 400Nm of torque which is channelised through a 6-speed manual or a 6-speed automatic. Upon start up, the engine feels reasonably quiet; although, getting going smoothly from standstill requires some getting used to as the light clutch has a very sudden bite. Also, considerable effort is required to change gears and slotting into fifth required plenty of guess work, too.

Easy drivability is a strength of this engine, with the turbo spooling up nice and early, letting you amble along in one gear. On the move you can haul the rev needle to the 4600rpm limiter if need be. The performance through that rev range is adequate, not exciting; no doubt, weighed down by the Hexa’s considerable 2280kg kerb weight. On the move the engine remains reasonably quiet till around 3200rpm.

Using Bosch’s ESP 9.0, the Hexa packs traction control, hill hold control and hill descent control. This combined with engine modes and on-demand all-wheel drive has allowed Tata Motors to offer drive modes – Auto, Dynamic, Comfort and Off-Road. For instance in Comfort, the sudden spike in torque is softened for a smoother drive experience, and the gentle responses are also used to help improve fuel efficiency. In Dynamic mode, the performance of the engine is unhindered and the ESP intervention is also delayed. While in other modes the all-wheel drive mode is engaged only when required with as much as 45 per cent of the torque being sent to the front wheels, in Off-road mode all four wheels get drive consistently. The ESP is also recalibrated in this mode to suit loose surfaces.

The combination that really impressed on our first drive was the one equipped with the automatic. The 6-speed gearbox, originally a GM design, makes the best of the engine character, shifting before the 3000rpm mark to make the experience all the more easy going. The shifts from the ‘box aren’t lightning quick, but in normal driving conditions it always seems to know what you want and hence feels natural to drive. In Sport mode the gearbox shifts down aggressively to keep the engine rpm in the 3-4000rpm range for maximum punch. You could even control the gear shifts by tapping the gear lever forward or back.


Hexa is offered in manual six-speed and automatic six-speed options. While the former comes with “Super Drive Modes” for surface-specific options, the automatic Hexa was tested for this review. And it was an absolute breeze.

The Hexa automatic offers a no-fuss, no-fancy drive with power coming up in a decently linear manner. No, it is not zippy but then, it would be unfair to expect a car this big to whizz around in city traffic. What is good though is that it moves in a leisurely enough manner in city traffic to ensure one doesn’t miss out on those important meetings.

Push the pedal harder and there is that slight sound of a muffled diesel gruff but on the whole, the Varicor 400 engine does a fantastic job of keeping itself composed. This and the extremely-well insulated cabin ensure that the crudeness of diesel experienced on most cars is disguised.

Where the Hexa does lag is in speeds well over three-digits. While getting there is no problem at all, the steering system sends back minor yet very noticeable vibrations – enough to make the slightly jittery driver even more jittery. This was experienced each time the car was taken well past 110kmph in this review.


The Hexa equipment list consists of six airbags, ESP, traction control, ABS with EBD, climate control with vents on all three rows, auto headlamps, rain sensing wipers, and reverse parking sensors with a camera. There’s also power mirrors with demister, cruise control, rear sun blinds, an eight-way adjustable driver’s seat (non-electric), a multi-function steering wheel, and a 5-inch touchscreen infotainment system with JBL speakers, to name a few.

It does miss out on features like powered seats and keyless go, which is a norm in the segment. There’s no sunroof either, which the rivals offer. In short, manual gearbox variants include XM and XT in six and seven seater options along with the choice of automatic transmissions called XMA and XTA. A 4×4 manual model is also available on the XT variant.


Has Tata done enough with the Hexa to let it succeed? We think so as this car has everything expected from a vehicle in the segment. It lacks things like keyless start, proper front storage spaces and is quite massive in terms of length- an issue that will pop up for parking space starved city dwellers. But on the positive side the feature list is comprehensive; it is quite spacious, has solid road presence and will let you go to most places without thinking twice. For the Hexa to now completely succeed Tata must price it in such a way that it undercuts its main rival- the Mahindra XUV500 variant-for-variant. Given the price range that we believe it will exist in, the Hexa is also a competitor for the range of D-segment sedans. Get On Road price of Tata Hexa from Tata Dealers in Hyderabad



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Audi Q5 Review & Test Drive


Positioned between the smallish Audi Q3 and the huge Audi Q7, the Q5 promises to be a great urban SUV. It can handle bad terrain, and won’t be too cumbersome to drive in traffic either. Also, given that it looks good too, Audi hasn’t had a problem with the competition either. Back on tarmac, it’s docile and boasts car-like dynamics.??While Porsche is readying the Macan (it will be priced higher than the Q5) and BMW has the X3 already, the Q5 enjoys its position, because of its capability as a product, and Audi’s well deserved value in the market.


The Audi Q5 comes up as a very subtle looking SUV. The overall design of it looks more coupe inspired than a typical SUV. The sloping roof lines, mild flares on the side with a longish bonnet make the Q5 look very suave in nature. The Q5 does not look like a typical in-your-face kind of a SUV but then it still has a bold look and looks contemporary.Having a family face, this one too has a single frame radiator grille which has been finished in gloss chrome. The vertical chrome struts look very neat. The three dimensionally finished bonnet flows very elegantly between the single frame grille to the front windshield making the design look very aerodynamic. The Xenon plus trapezoidal headlamps sweep back to the side.

The side profile is humble. The window lines have been done in chrome. The Audi Q5 measures 4629mm in length. That also translated to good interior space. This one gets a 10 spoke V shaped lightweight forged aluminum wheels and 235/60 R18 tyres. The combination of these two make the car look dynamic. The roof line drops very subtly and the lip of the roofline ends with a spoiler which makes it look sporty.The rear has wide spread tail lamps. The tail gate indeed gives it a distinct look and one can easily it’s an Audi you are following. The tail gate is indeed very practical and makes it very practical to load and unload. Hidden under the massive chunk of a rear bumper are the exhaust diffusers which have been done in brush Aluminum.

So, the new Q5 which recently got its dose of updates is a good looking SUV. It looks more like a big hatch and less of a SUV. The fact that the Q5 is selling in good numbers also assures that India has matured as a market in terms of taste and choice. So, the Q5 packs in cues from Big-Bro Q7 and still manages its own character. The daytime running LED lights of the Q5 are just an icing and looks simply awesome.


Perhaps even more vast a change than the exterior, the 2017 Q5’s interior gets huge update. It takes after Audi’s current design styling and features a low-hung, thin dashboard with its Virtual Cockpit gauge cluster, minimalist HVAC controls, and (oddly) tacked on infotainment screen. The center console also sports a new design that includes a new electronic gear shifter and track pad. The steering wheel takes after other Audi models, as well, and features a thin yet sculpted design. The hexagonal grille design is mirrored on the airbag cover, too.

In-dash technology includes Audi’s Virtual Cockpit with its 12.3-inch TFT screen and configurable digital gauges. The MMI infotainment screen perched above the center console offers 8.3-inches of viewing screen and is controlled by both touch and the large track pad just ahead of the shifter. The pad offers smartphone-like controls, with pinch-to-zoom and finger-writing to text capability. The system also features Audi’s Personal Route Assist, which learns your driving habits and can suggest alternate routs should traffic have your usual route blocked. Onboard LTE Wi-Fi allows the Q5 to be an online hotspot and there’s even a Qi wireless phone charger and integrated phone antenna to keep smartphone powered and connected. Audiophiles will appreciate the Bang & Olufsen Sound System with 3D sound.

Rear seats offer a good amount of legroom matched with lightly bolstered outboard seats and decent headroom. HVAC vents keep rear passengers happy on hot or cold days, and an optional rear seat entertainment package features two huge screens.The seats also fold flat, offering an impressive amount of cargo room. Audi says there’s 54.7 cubic feet of space with the seats stowed. With the second row in place, cargo room is cut down to 21.5 cubic feet of space. That’s does represent an improvement of 0.4 cubic feet of the last Q5.


We have already witnessed the 3.0-litre, V6 TDI diesel engine in the Audi A6 and Audi A7 earlier, but this motor just doesn’t cease to amaze us every single time. In the Q5, Audi has boosted the output by 5 BHP and 78 Nm, which is quite significant considering the added twist on offer. However the addition in power hasn’t come at the cost of economy and Audi claims that the new Q5 is up to 15 percent more efficient than its predecessor. Power delivery is instant and rewarding and NVH levels are very good with very little diesel grunt audible inside the luxurious cabin.

This engine is mated to a 7-spveed S tronic transmission which is at the forefront ensuring smooth cog swapping. There are no paddle shifts even on the top-end variant which comes as a disappointment, however one can take control of things by using the tiptronic function on the gear lever. Performance, as you would expect, is nothing short of explosive with every dab on the accelerator pedal resulting in an instantaneous surge ahead with plenty of reserve still left. Power delivery although linear, is still addictive and there is a definite shove in your knickers when you bury your right foot in the floor.

We can go endlessly with praise about the 3.0-litre TDI engine, it’s that darn good. The motor feels at home at all speeds, whether its ambling around the city, sprinting on open roads or simply cruising on the highways. This mill does a splendid job in hauling the 1.8 tonne Q5 with urgency and blurred scenery. The Audi drive select system offers various modes which control the accelerator pedal characteristics, automatic transmission shift points and amount of steering assist as well. How has Audi managed to boost performance and efficiency at the same time? The German car maker has reduced weight with the use of aluminum on the engine hood and tail gate. Whoever said ‘you can’t have your cake and eat it too’ was wrong, very wrong!


Apart from the engines, the other thing that Audi did not have to do much to was the quattro all-wheel-drive system, which has widely grown to be accepted as one of the best traction aids in the market. The bit of fine-tuning they’ve done has resulted in smoother transitioning from the efficient front-wheel-drive set-up to the all-wheel drive, but can you and I tell the difference? Probably not. What you will notice, however, is the new multi-link suspension set-up with the optional air suspension which has made the ride quality and transfer of weight noticeably more pliant. You can feel the suspension complying with the quattro system more amicably when you chuck the car into corners, pretending it’s a low-slung sportscar. It’ll play pretend along with you, keeping things tidy and under control. What also helps is that the new chassis takes away 90kg from the Q5’s kerb which helps it behave on the road the way it does.


It has a list of safety aspects including a central locking system, heat insulating glass, a windscreen cleaning system, movable sun visors, sun blinds, roof-edge spoiler and anti-theft alarm. It has an advanced immobilizer system, first aid kit with warning triangle, tyre pressure monitoring system, a collapsible spare wheel and ISOFIX child seat mounting.


There are a lot of products in the market that shout for attention, displaying a probable lack of substance. The Audi Q5 is the exact opposite. It is quite capable but doesn’t give a clue about it, until you get behind the wheel.The simple but effective styling, the range of good engines, and a wide array of options makes the Audi Q5 so special. The 2.0TDI is the choice of the lot. It has a good amount of power, and doesn’t drink too much of fuel either. ?It’s comfortable and spacious inside as well, which means if you are going to be chauffeured around in one of these, you won’t have any problems either. Add the good amount of stability and safety options the vehicle offers, and you have a winner in your hands.

Audi Q5 30 Tdi Quattro Premium Ex-showroom Price is   50,59,500/- and On Road Price is   58,97,652/- in Bangalore. Audi Q5 30 Tdi Quattro Premium comes in 6 colours, namely Scuba Blue,Ibis White,Monsoon Grey,Teak Brown,Florett Silver,Mythos Black.For more details of Audi Cars click on to


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Mitsubishi Pajero Sport Review,Interiors,Mileages & Performance


Mitsubishi might be a pale shadow of its former self but their greatest hits back catalog still has some prized – and revered – name plates. Lancer, particularly when suffixed with Evolution, will get every petrol heads’ unwavering attention; rallyists in India will brook no trash-talk of the Cedia; and off-road enthusiasts still whisper Pajero in respectful tones. Yet nobody, not even enthusiasts, buy Mitsubishis anymore and the reason is simple: everything is dated, overpriced, burns the wrong fuel and have long since lost relevance to the Indian market.

However just when things looked beyond salvage the strongest nameplate in the cupboard has been dusted out, polished and given a fresh lease of life. The Pajero Sport, unlike what the name suggests, has nothing to do with the Pajero, Montero or all those Repsol-liveried, Ralliart-fettled, Dakar-conquering machines – this is a completely different SUV line designed for the rough and tumble of emerging markets. In fact the design, engineering and underlying ethos have more in common with the Toyota Fortuner than any other Mitsubishi. Like the Fortuner which is based on the Hilux pickup platform the Pajero Sport too shares its platform with the Triton pickup. And just like Toyota who have concentrated manufacturing of the Hilux, Fortuner and its derivatives in Thailand (not Japan) to keep costs in check so too is Thailand the mother plant for the Pajero Sport from where completely built up units will be initially imported with CKD operations set to commence in Chennai from September.


Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is built on the platform of company’s light pick-up trucks which are sold in bulk in Thailand. In fact, the company designers have lifted the nose structure as it is from its rally car, the Pajero Evo. The Chrome plated vertical bar type front grille is integrated adjacently with the projector beam headlamps which come with a functionality of self-leveling. The fog lamps right under the headlamps is a big turn on. The enormous wheel arches on both sides that have 17×7.5 JJ Alloy wheels; go well with the overall front fascia of the SUV.

Beneath the front bumper, there is plenty of space due to the enlarged ground clearance of 215mm in the SUV. The Japanese auto-major has executed chrome pretty well with certain sections of the SUV like the chrome-plated power door mirrors and door handles strike the right chord and provide a bit of much needed sophistication and plushness to the SUV unlikely of its stony exterior appearance. Additionally, black roof rails, high-mounted stop lamp at rear, chrome-plated rear license plate garnish, colour-keyed side protector mouldings, etc. are like icing on the cake.


Open the heavy door and climb into the car and you will appreciate the build quality of this vehicle, the Pajero Sport showing a lot of solidity. When you close the door, there is a massive thud too and quality levels are very good. The dashboard is nice but there are just too many colours on it, the dash is a dual-tone black and beige unit while the centre console gets wood finish and the centre AC vents gets a silver surrounding. There is no digital climate control on this Mitsubishi which is shocking of course but there is decent amount of kit on offer like projector headlights (for the low beam only), puddle lamps on each door, illuminated key ring, electric driver seat adjustment, leather seats, rear parking sensors, reverse camera, Bluetooth connectivity and a touch-screen audio system with Navigation along with the usual iPod, USB, AUX and CD options. Right above the infotainment screen is a multi-information display (not in the instrument cluster) which displays average speed, fuel efficiency, range, date, outside temperate and elevation.

Somethings do look like an after thought in this cabin, like the mic for the Bluetooth and the speaker for the same, it’s exposed, both the mic and the speaker making this look like an after market job. There are plenty of storage bins inside the cabin, the glovebox has good depth (although it isn’t much wide) and it gets a lock too. Other storage areas include a box below the AC controls on the centre console, under the front centre arm rest, two cupholders next to the handbrake, sunglass holder on the roof but there is no magazine pocket behind the driver’s seat. The door pockets are a tad small and 1-litre bottles will be a tight fit on the front doors while the rear doors have been shaped in a way (have an inward scoop) that they can easily take a litre sized bottle.

The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport has comfortable seats which coupled with the airy cabin (due to large windows and beige seats) makes this car a nice place to be in for long journeys. The front two rows are high on comfort with the middle row having ample legroom too, it also gets coat hooks next to the grab rails. Under thigh support isn’t a problem in the first row but a bit lacking in the second row and very bad in the last row, where you have to naturally climb in to get in. While headroom is good all throughout, the last row only has average legroom, making it best for children. There is a slight hump in the floor in the second row and there are only two headrests in this row, so it’s best used by two people, making the Pajero Sport a good four seater. Cup holders and storage space is on the right side in the last row. The AC vents are roof mounted and controls are placed in the second row but the master AC switch for the rear is placed too low and out of sight on the dashboard. Boot space is lacking with all three rows up but you can flip forward the second row and flat fold the third row completely to boost luggage space. There is also a power socket in the boot.


This model series is available with a commanding 2.5-litre diesel mill that has the displacement capacity of 2477cc. It is based on a double overhead camshaft valve configuration. It has four cylinders that are further fitted with sixteen valves. This mill is integrated with a common rail direct injection system that helps in returning a decent fuel economy. This intercooled turbocharged power plant enables it to pump out a maximum power of 175.56bhp at 4000rpm, which is quite good. At the same time, it yields a peak torque output of 400Nm in the range of 2000 to 2500rpm, which is rather good considering the road and traffic conditions in India. This vehicle is offered with a two gear box options for the customers to select from, which are five speed manual as well as automatic transmission gear box that makes gear shifting quite easier.

The automaker is offering this model series with the same diesel power plant that has a common rail fuel injection technology. It is currently available with both manual and automatic transmission gearbox options for the buyers to choose from. Its manual version has the ability to produce a maximum mileage of 13.5 Kmpl on highways, which goes down to a minimum of 11.5 Kmpl under city traffic conditions. However, its automatic version can deliver a mileage in the range of 10 to 12 Kmpl.Its diesel engine comprises of 4-cylinders that further have 16-valves and is based on a DOHC valve configuration. Both the manual and automatic versions have the ability to produce a maximum power of 175.56bhp that yields a commanding torque output of 400NM, which is rather good.


The 4×4 vehicle with manual gearbox reaches up to100 kmph speed within just 11 seconds and clocks a maximum speed in the range of 190 to 195 Kmph. The manual variant returns a mileage of 13.5 kmpl on highways and around 11.5 kmpl in city traffic conditions. On the contrary, 4×2 version with 5-speed automatic gearbox has the capacity of breaching 100 kmph speed mark within just 12 seconds and reach up to a peak speed of 190 Kmph. This variant offers a mileage within the range of 10 to 12 kmpl.

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This giant vehicle is equipped with a reliable suspension system that ensures maximum stability and balance on any road conditions. The front axle is integrated with a double wishbone while the rear one is fitted with a 3-link coil spring type of system. In order to avoid uneven road jerks, this car is loaded with stabilizer bars.Further, 16-inche ventilated disc brakes are mounted on the front wheels, which are hydraulically operated with two circuits. The rear wheels are equipped with a set of 16-inche ventilated drum-in-disc brakes, which are hydraulically operated with split brake. All these features ensure prompt and enhanced braking experience. Not just these, Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) and Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) are featured in this variant for enriched braking mechanism. This utility vehicle is loaded with a torsion-resistant rigid ladder frame for enhanced stability and ‘With on-demand 4WD’ for sure traction. The beams provide added protection to the occupants in case of collision.


The automaker has loaded this sports utility vehicle with many vital aspects that will offer protection to all its passengers and the vehicle as well. There are dual front SRS (supplemental restraint system) airbags offered, which minimizes the injury in the event of a collision. Its has an extra strong body construction that is built using high tensile steel at crucial locations, which makes it rigid. Another aspects is the electronic engine immobilizer, which prevents any unauthorized entry into the vehicle and protects it from theft. It also includes side impact protection beams and crumple zones, which helps it to absorb jolts caused in case of a collision. This vehicle is integrated with several advanced features like an anti lock braking system with electronic brake force distribution, three point ELR seat belts, collapsible steering column and anti intrusion brake pedals that further enhances the level of security.


The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is by far the most under-rated vehicle in its class. Sure there are issues with the way Mitsubishi and its laid back partner, Hindustan Motors has gone about handling business in the country but as a product, the Pajero Sport is a fine vehicle, deserving much applaud. This vehicle is very well engineered, packs in a lot of comfort and has a visual appeal that shouts SUV. With a good diesel engine under its belly and a terrific ride quality, the Pajero Sport comes across as an excellent alternative in the segment, the automatic version only broadening this two ton vehicle’s appeal even further.

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Merecedes Benz S Class Review,Equipments,Features & Performance


The Mercedes-Benz S-Class is a premium luxury sedan available from Mercedes-Benz in India. It is powered by one petrol engine and one diesel engine options. The boot space volume on the Mercedes-Benz S-Class is 510 litres for the petrol and 530 litres for the diesel and the fuel tank capacity is 70 litres. It has a turning radius of 12.3 metres. The sedan is available in four exterior colour options, Polar White, Obsidian Black, Iridium Silver and Palladium Silver. The Mercedes-Benz S-Class is available with two different 19 inch alloy wheel designs and is available with a Burmester 3D surround sound infotainment package as standard.


The new Mercedes Benz Maybach S600 Guard looks exactly the same like the existing S Class variants, but with some minor differences. Only a keen eye will be able to notice the exact difference. As we can see, its external appearance is gracefully designed with splendid build quality down to the closest detail. It is pretty long, wide and reasonably low in height that expresses the royalty from all frames. Further adding to its appeal is the expressive lines that stretches from the front to the rear end through the door panels.While its coupe and sedan versions look completely different from each other. The coupe trims are designed with two doors, and have sleek, bold and stylish body structure as compared to other trims.

However, its AMG version looks sportier than the regular variants, thanks to its exclusive package featuring bumpers, alloy wheels, a distinctly designed radiator grille and extensive black accents as well.To start with the front, it has a beautifully sculptured signature grille with thick chrome surround. It is accompanied by the company’s emblem positioned on top of the hood.On either sides of the grille, there are large headlight clusters featuring adaptive bi-xenon headlamps along with LED daytime running lights.

By the sides, its fenders are mated with stylish set of alloy wheels that adds grace to the facet. The outside mirrors have a neat, clean design and comes integrated with LED turn blinkers.Coming to the rear section, it has a large tailgate with U shape that is decorated with chrome accents. Surrounding this is the distinctly crafted taillight cluster that is integrated with innovative LED light pattern.The overall look is simply magnificent that can grab attention of any automobile enthusiast.


The cabins of most flagship luxury cars feel like bigger, fancier versions of “lesser” models, sharing a general design aesthetic and many control components. Not so the 2017 Mercedes-Benz S-Class. Even though the new E-Class has borrowed a few design cues and controls, the S-Class remains a special car that exists above the rest. There is an elegance and sense of opulence that make it feel more like a competitor for a Bentley than a BMW.

Beyond aesthetics, few cars can approach the new S-Class’ comfort and infotainment features. The standard seats are lovely, but we recommend the Premium package’s multicontour seats with their additional adjustments, ventilation and six massage settings. That’s right, six. One even simulates a hot stone massage by utilizing the seat’s heating elements. And just in case your rear passengers are the jealous sort, the same opulent front-seat features (including their adjustments) are available in the sedan’s enormous backseat. Plus, you can add an entertainment system, airplane-style pop-out tables and even a fridge.

Those aren’t available on the coupe and convertible, but even their backseats are generously sized for a two-door car. Plus, the coupe’s lack of side roof pillars provides a wide-open, windows-down driving experience that few other cars can match. You’ll also find the convertible’s top-up or top-down driving experience impressively serene, especially with the standard Aircap wind deflector raised.All of the S-Class’ many infotainment functions are controlled by the latest iteration of Mercedes’ COMAND system, which is reasonably user-friendly given the immense number of functions it’s tasked with. Just make sure to spend a lot of time trying things out and asking questions of your Mercedes salesperson or dealership concierge.

The trunk, as you might expect from a 17-foot-long sedan, is sufficiently large at 16.3 cubic feet. Note, however, that the available 24-speaker Burmester high-end sound system “significantly” reduces trunk space, according to Mercedes. The S550e plug-in hybrid also has a smaller trunk (12.2 cubic feet) because of its battery pack. The coupe’s trunk is on the small side for a coupe, especially such a large one, at 10.4 cubic feet. The Cabriolet is a bit better at 12.4 cubes, but it’s reduced to 8.8 when the roof is lowered.


The drivetrain department boasts more changes than any other area. Specifically, Mercedes-Benz just introduced two brand-new engines. The U.S. lineup will now include the S450, which uses a biturbo, 3.0-liter V-6 that cranks out 362 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque. Given that the outgoing lineup begins with the S550, the S450 will become the new entry-level model in North America. A 4Matic version with all-wheel drive will also be offered.Speaking of the S550, it was replaced with the S560. Along with the name change comes with a new drivetrain, as Mercedes dropped the 4.7-liter V-8 in favor of the smaller, twin-turbo, 4.0-liter unit. Rated at 463 horses and 516 pound-feet, it’s 14 horsepower more potent than the outgoing powerplant, but at the same time, it consumes about 10 percent less fuel than its predecessor.

To lower the fuel consumption, four cylinders of the new V-8 are deactivated simultaneously under partial load with the help of the CAMTRONIC valve-lift adjustment system. This reduces gas-cycle losses and enhances the overall efficiency of the four firing cylinders by shifting the operating point towards higher loads.In Europe, the existing V-6 diesel was replaced by the company’s new 3.0-liter inline-six. This new mill cranks out 282 horsepower and 443 pound-feet in the S350d (a 27-horsepower increase and 14-pound-foot decrease) and 335 horses and 516 pound-feet in the S400d. The latter is the most powerful diesel Mercedes-Benz ever.


Silky smooth would be the best way to describe the new S-Class’ performance and handling on road. Occupants are brilliantly insulated from the external influence such as wind or tyre noise, rough asphalt, etc. The S-Class just simply glides over virtually any road surface without letting the occupants know what’s underneath. It continues to provide a ride you’d expect from a top-notch premium luxury sedan. The compliant suspension ably cancels out road imperfections while also keeping body roll in check. The V8 powertrain in the S500 (our test car) doesn’t really give the driver anything to complain about except for the fact that top speed is electronically limited to 250 km/hr. The S500 uses a 4.7-litre V8 petrol engine with 449 BHP of power, doing 0-100 km/hr in 4.8 seconds. However the variant most relevant to India is the S350, which uses a 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine. The BlueTEC mill offers 255 BHP of power, enabling a 0-100 km/hr sprint in 6.8 seconds. Performance is effortless and you simply exercise your right foot to gather quick momentum. All engines are Euro 6 compliant and are mated to a 7-speed automatic gearbox. Not that it matters much but fuel consumption has reduced and the new S-Class is more efficient than its predecessor. ECO start/stop function is standard across the range.

Just like before, ride quality is superb and the car’s air suspension combines smoothness with complete control and utter stability as you waft along faster than you think. The electro-mechanical steering is reasonably fluid, linear, predictable and surprisingly quick for such a long wheelbase car. It takes a few kilometres of driving to get used to it as the car may turn more than you anticipated given the amount of movement on the steering wheel. The overall impression is that you get that stately luxury car feel without feeling overly isolated from the driving experience.Of the new technologies offered, on the move, the car’s ability to detect bumps on the road ahead and adjusting the chassis in a blink of an eye was most impressive. The Mercedes S-Class detects such unevenness by means of the stereo camera which sets up the suspension in advance to deal with the situation, in practical purposes, you can drive over a speed hump at 40 km/hr without even noticing it.


The braking capacity of this car is unique and thumping. It is loaded with exceptional safety features that avoid accidents. An inbuilt technology responds before the danger comes and protects the driver or passengers from any mishap. The safety aspects are truly brilliant as the Mercedes-Benz looks ahead to future for higher safety measures. It is packed with optional and standard safety functions that alarm the driver and eliminates the chances of collisions.


When this updated S-class comes to India in the first half of 2018, it will likely launch with the new straight six diesel and the re-tuned V6 petrol, with the V8 version joining later on, along with AMG and Maybach versions too. The new engines are welcome step forward in refinement and performance, although the latter was not really required in a new S-class. Expect prices to increase a bit, which should put it in the Rs 1.2-1.4 crore (ex-showroom) range for the ‘standard’ models. In diesel guise at least, the current S-class is already our pick of the segment, and its position is likely to only grow stronger when the updated version arrives. However, launching around the same time will be Audi’s brand-new A8 limousine, which also promises to set new benchmarks in technology, equipment, comfort and interior quality, and along with the still-fresh BMW 7-series, is a tussle worth looking forward to. Of course, the rather interesting automated driving features that we got to sample in Zurich won’t make it to India, but even without them, the S-class remains possibly the most complete sedan for the chauffeur-driven.​

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Toyota Prius Exterios,Interiors,Performance & Driving


The Toyota Prius had set a new benchmark in the luxury hybrid car segment. The new Toyota Prius has been upgraded in terms of performance parameters and styling features. The exteriors feature new LED headlamps and fog lamps with daytime running lights. The new interior features introduced in this model include a multi-information instrument cluster with a head-up display and a new touchscreen display music system with 10 speakers. The safety features of seven airbags, including driver knee airbag, ABS with EBD and traction control, are featured in this model.


Most of the automakers spend relatively more time on the drawing board when it comes to designing a hybrid or electric vehicle. There are no exceptions in the case of the Prius, as Toyota has paid special attention to the futuristic styling of this hybrid vehicle. It is indeed an attention seeker because of its unique design and for the fact that there are very few examples on our roads. Up front the Prius boasts of a sharp headlight cluster housing projector lamps along with a thin grille divided by the Toyota logo, which is highlighted in blue shade to tell that it’s a hybrid Toyota. On the front bumper it gets a wide air inlet that integrates fog lamps alongside vertically shaped turn indicators, which is a neat touch.

The side profile of the Toyota Prius reflects a fish like design. The steeply raked windshield blends with the swoopy roofline that ends immediately at the angular shaped tail of the car. There is a sharp shoulder line on the side that erupts from the headlights and continues till the tail lights. The 15-inch wheels look a tad small in proportion to the well-sized body. The rear is the most attractive part of the Prius, where the hatch acts as a rear windshield blended with the roofline, which drops flat at the end, pointed with a sharp edge that looks like an integrated spoiler. The rear bumper is big and chunky and the vertical tail lamps are sharply treated with shiny bits, attracting good attention at the rear.


The new Prius has received an interior with just enough changes to call it new. The car’s traditional high-mounted driver information cluster appears to have remained in place. In fact, this particular design strategy has been a staple for quite some time now, going all the way back to Asian models like the Toyota Vios.The multi-layered dashboard is a nice touch and I also like how the chrome trim creates a separate compartment for the new infotainment screen and the HVAC control buttons at the bottom.

The biggest issue I see is the size and positioning of the gear shifter. It’s one thing for the shifter to be small or located in an unusual place. It’s another thing for it to be both, which is what you’ll get on the new Prius. The white surround does pop out from the mostly black interior, but it looks like it’s made of plastic. The mobile phone charger and the cup holders in the tunnel are nice and functional additions.For the most part, the cabin looks clean and smooth, although it might have been better off with a more traditional transmission tunnel instead of having the shifter resemble a video game joystick.


The Prius uses Toyota’s Hybrid Synergy Drive that in this application comprises a 98hp, 1.8-litre petrol engine – that runs the efficient Atkinson cycle – and a 53kW (72hp) electric motor that draws power from a 6.5Ah nickel-metal hydride battery. Do note, the latest Prius is also available with a superior lithium-ion battery but the higher cost is sure to have ruled it out for India. The combined output of the hybrid system is 122hp.Getting going in a Prius is an occasion, or actually a non-occasion. Provided there’s enough juice in the battery, the Prius will come to life in full-electric mode giving you the opportunity to make a noise and emission-free getaway. The Prius can run in full-electric mode, and on battery power alone, at speeds up to 50kph but you’ll have to be gentle with throttle inputs to manage so; the combustion engine wakes up when the system senses that more power is needed, or simply when the battery needs charging. Full-electric mode is perfectly useable in city traffic and there’s ample power on call to keep pace with traffic. When the engine does kick in, you can feel the additional power at your disposal. With both engine and motor at work, the Prius does manage to feel brisk enough. What is good is that the CVT gearbox doesn’t spoil the experience as it does on the Camry Hybrid, with far less of that irritating ‘rubber band’ effect. But outright performance is anyway not the focus here, fuel economy is. The Prius boasts an ARAI-tested fuel economy of 26.27kpl, though the car’s onboard computer showed a figure closer to 18kpl on our drive that included city streets and smooth moving highway stretches. Think about it, only a few small cars deliver that sort of efficiency.

Also impressive is the Prius’ overall level of refinement. The petrol engine runs quietly for the most part and only sounds strained when you really extend it, while much of the other sounds from outside stay where they belong.The new Prius is the first car to be built on Toyota’s new modular TNGA platform that will eventually underpin everything from compact sportscars to SUVs. And if the Prius’ generally impressive driving manners are a sign of things to come, there’s a lot to expect from future Toyotas. Yes, this is a Prius that you can actually have some fun behind the wheel of. It does roll considerably in the corners but the steering feels nicely weighted and offers pretty good feel, and there is good grip on offer too. Even brake pedal feel (the Prius uses regenerative braking) is much improved. And though squeaky, the low rolling resistance tyres also hold on quite gamely. Make no mistake though. The new Prius is not a sporty car. But rather than feeling like an appliance as old Prius models did, this one feels like a nice-to-drive mainstream car. For one, it’s a whole lot nicer to drive than Toyota’s own Camry Hybrid.


Strong disc brakes clamp down on the front as well as the rear, and we thought that the overall braking quality was superb. Cornering is easy, and slowing down and halting requires little strain. There is no body roll, but high speed does shake up the inside a bit. Coming to the suspension system, there is a McPherson strut armed onto the front axle. We thought that the overall ride was comfortable enough, but conditions could defer depending on the road terrain. The vehicle absorbs moderate road anomalies well, and we thought an average Indian passenger would feel quite satisfied with the overall comfort.


The Toyota Prius Hybrid features has ventilated disc brakes at the front and solid disc brakes at the rear. The firm grip on the road by the alloy wheels is further improved with anti-lock braking system, brake assist, electronic brake force distribution and traction control, assuring effortless driving on all sources. The safety features in this variant include airbags for the driver, co-passenger, side airbag at the front, curtain airbags at the rear and driver knee airbag.


Here’s the thing with the new Prius ­­– given the lack of support from the government in terms of taxation, it is expensive. What’s more, one can buy more conventional cars for similar money that offer better features, more driving fun, and even higher practicality and comfort. What these conventional cars lack, however, is a statement. So, if I had an M3 in my garage to burn both fuel and rubber over the weekends, and I had judgmental friends at the club, I’d buy the Prius as my second car in a heartbeat; you know to handle the daily commute and put a lid on the club gossip.

Toyota Prius Z8 Ex-showroom Price is   44,95,034/- and On Road Price is   47,29,000/- in Pondicherry. Toyota Prius Z8 comes in 7 colours, namely Emotional Red,Attitude Black Mica,Grey Metallic,Silver Metallic,White Pearl Crystal Shine,Super White,Dark Blue Mica Metallic.Test drive for Toyota Prius.

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Tata Nexon Overview,Interiors,Mileage & Specifications


The sub 4-metre subcompact SUV segment of which the new Tata Nexon is one of the most popular and most aspirational automotive segments in the country. Maruti Suzuki consistently sells over 10,000 units of the Vitara Brezza every month and the Ecosport single handedly helped recover Ford India’s lull a few years ago. Mahindra has four SUVs in this segment too – the TUV 300, the Bolero Power+, the KUV 100 and the NuvoSport and even Hyundai and Datsun will soon launch brand new SUVs in this segment. So it was only obvious that sooner or later, any automaker who wants to be a real volume player in the Indian market needs to have a model present in this segment. Tata Motors first showcased a concept compact SUV called the Nexon at the 2014 Indian Auto Expo and an almost production ready version of the Tata Nexon at the 2016 Indian Auto Expo. While most of us expected the production SUV to be watered down version of the concept, the Indian automaker has surprised us by launching the Tata Nexon subcompact SUV that is very close to the concept’s original look and design. And the last time that happened was when Jaguar launched the F-Pace! So read on to know more about the brand new 2017 Tata Nexon!


The Tata Nexon is neither a sub-compact SUV nor a hatchback on stilts. It’s a crossover in the true sense. The SUV traits of the Nexon are ground clearance, which at 209mm is comparable with the Renault Duster, and large 16-inch wheels. The high-stance is married with a coupe-like sloping roofline that rakes sharply like that of the Range Rover Evoque.The unconventional design is eye-catchy, which should make it hard to miss when parked beside other hatchbacks and compact SUVs. The top-spec XZ+ variant of the Nexon that we drove sported a contrast-colour roof in steel grey with both red and blue exterior colours. The signature element is an off-white plastic trim that runs just under the greenhouse on the side. It continues at the rear too, but that’s paint and not plastic. Tata could have done away with it, but then, they could have overdone it too, which they have not.

Apart from the grey roof and off-white sash, there’s another contrasting element on the outside – the black plastic cladding. It does its job of making the Nexon look rugged and high-heeled quite well.Look straight into the Nexon’s eyes, and you’ll get a hint of Tata’s ‘Impact’ design. The front grille’s top line extends into the headlamps, and onto the side. That’s the ‘humanity line’ in Tata lingo. The Nexon’s design is, however, more aggressive than its siblings. The elements that add to the bold front look are pulled back projector headlamps with LED daytime running lamps, high-set fog lamps, a large front air intake and flared wheel arches.While the Nexon looks SUV-ish from the front, the rear is more hatchback-like. The high ground clearance is hard to miss, and the stock tyres (215/60 R16) look wide for a vehicle of the Nexon’s size. The faux skid plate on the rear bumper adds some ruggedness. There’s an off-white and glossy black element around the clear-lens tail lamps that adds quirkiness to the design, but you get used to it with time.


The interior is filled with new techie stuff and the focus on quality and refinement is quite apparent. The highlight is what Tata calls the Grand Centre Console, which really pushes the boundaries of what we expect of a car in this segment. From the neatly tucked in handbrake lever to the sliding tambour door mechanism, everything looks and feels a few classes above.Then, there’s the first in segment Multi Drive Modes selector dial that lets you choose between Eco, City and Sport settings. The theme colour of the infotainment screen changes to match the driving mode you are on. Don’t get your hopes too high though – it doesn’t have any off road setting because the Nexon is a front wheel drive car.

Unlike the exterior, the dashboard follows a simple and straightforward design. You get a floating 6.5-inch touchscreen that supports Android Auto. Tata says Apple Car play will be introduced soon. Infotainment system comes with the ability to read out text and Whatsapp messages and send replies using voice commands. The HD display offers intuitive interface and responds quickly. You can access all functions with minimal ‘eyes off the road time’. Nexon also offers a lot of niceties including the superbly sounding Harman music system, automatic climate control, navigation through the connected smartphone, voice commands for most functions, reverse camera and most importantly, a wearable smartkey. However, the steering wheel and the instrument panel have been carried over from the Tiago and Tigor.

There are 31 smart storage areas including a huge glovebox, bottle holders and even umbrella holders on the doors to make the cabin very practical.The front seats are well padded for great comfort and support. Height adjustable driver seat and tiltable steering ensure finding a suitable driving position is not an issue. You would appreciate the elevated driving position and the excellent visibility in all directions. However, rear visibility is slightly compromised thanks to the small rear windscreen.There’s adequate legroom for rear passengers and despite the sloping roof, head room is generous too. Yet, the rear bench is not wide enough for three passengers. Centre armrests with cupholders and rear air vents make things more comfortable at the back.350 litres of boot space can be expanded to 690 litres by folding the rear seat on a 60:40 ratio.


Tata is offering all-new petrol and diesel engines in the Nexon. Both can be upgraded to BS-VI norms as and when the mandate comes in. While the basic architecture of the 1.2-litre indirect injection turbo-petrol engine is the same as the Tiago’s 3-cylinder motor, Tata says that they have used all the know-how from the Zest’s turbopetrol unit and incorporated it here. So while the block remains the same, the engine is lighter than the Zest’s turbocharged unit and also makes 110PS of power and 170Nm of torque. These figures in the compact SUV segment are lower than that of only the EcoSport’s 125PS turbo-petrol engine.The diesel, in the meanwhile, is a 1.5-litre unit that makes the same amount of power as the petrol but a significantly higher 260Nm of torque. Both the engines are mated to 6-speed manual transmissions, with AMTs to be slotted in at a later date. Tata also offers the aforementioned Drive modes in both the variants. The Drive modes can be accessed via the rotary knob and can be changed on the move. The good part about this dial is that whatever mode you’ve selected, there will be an audio note telling you the selection and the colour of the infotainment system too changes a la Mini Cooper style. The dial also remembers the last selection made and sticks to it even after the car has been switched off.

We had a go at the turbopetrol engine first. At start-up, the engine has decent refinement; however, on the move, it is audible. There is some amount of turbolag and the motor isn’t that happy sitting at high revs. What it is happy doing is cruising. At around 1,600rpm, the engine is doing 100 clicks in top gear. Good for those efficiency numbers then. It is also tractable and even at a higher gear and low revs, the engine is happy. For example – 40kmph in fourth gear is possible and the engine doesn’t really protest. But if you want quick acceleration, you need to drop a couple of gears before making any progress. The hairpins up Idukki dam were taken in second gear; however, the moment brisk acceleration was called for uphill, I had to downshift. Rowing through the gears though is pretty much fun as the gearbox is slick. Vibrations are present though and manifest through the pedals and gear lever. However, they aren’t at an alarming level.The diesel, in the meanwhile, sounds as refined as the Brezza’s unit. It, however, is the punchier of the two motors. The clutch is light and has a short travel while the gearshift too is smooth. Surprisingly, the diesel is a bit more eager to rev than the petrol. Tractability remains common for both with the exception that hurried progress doesn’t really require dropping a gear in the diesel. This will be the engine to watch out amongst the two. It has less turbolag and gets the job done in a better fashion.The Drive modes do alter the engine mapping and throttle setting, but over the years Tata Motors has refined it. The Sport mode no longer feels snappy. Instead it is quite linear. Around 70 per cent of our first drive review was done in this mode. City is the apt one for err…in the city while Eco dulls out the throttle response and requires a bit more of patience when hurried progress is to be made.


Where the Nexon scores top marks, however, is in the ride and handling department. Ride quality isn’t pillow-soft and you do feel some of the larger bumps, but the suspension rounds off sharp edges brilliantly. The little bit of stiffness in the suspension also means there is not much pitching or bobbing and body roll is well contained despite the Nexon’s height. There is a bit more up-down movement in the lighter petrol car, but on the whole ride quality is really impressive. The steering, borrowed from the Zest, is spot-on and one of the best electrically assisted units we’ve experienced in this class of car. It has a reassuring on-centre feel and weights up perfectly as you pile on the lock. All of this translates to brilliant overall stability, and with a best-in-class 209mm of ground clearance, and lots of wheel travel you really don’t need to slow down for potholes.The stiff chassis, impressive brakes and generous grip from the fat 215/60 R16 tyres give a lot of confidence through corners. It doesn’t feel as keen to drive as an EcoSport and isn’t as surefooted either, but work up a rhythm, keep the engines in their sweet spot and you’ll be nicely rewarded.


Tata Motors is offering dual front airbags and ABS with EBD on all variants. You also get a seat belt height adjuster standard on the Nexon. We all are pretty much familiar with the sales and service of the automaker. Sales outlets across the country are aplenty and service centres are also in abundance. While service quality levels may not be the best, Tata isn’t that bad either and the company is working their way up.


So it seems, Tata’s holistic approach towards the Nexon has paid off. The flamboyant styling, superbly finished cabin, modern tech along with impressive performance are sure to win many hearts. Moreover, Tata is already revamping the dealership and aftersales experience to welcome the Nexon.Yet, we all know that it’s not going to be cakewalk for the Nexon as it will be running into formidable competition from the heavyweights like the Vitara Brezza and the Ecosport. However, despite a few minor niggles, the Tata Nexon is well-placed to put the competition to shame and rake in good numbers.

Tata Nexon Revotron Xe Ex-showroom Price is   5,97,315/- and On Road Price is   6,89,807/- in Chennai. Tata Nexon Revotron Xe comes in 5 colours, namely Vermont Red,Moroccan Blue,Glasgow Grey,Calgary White,Seattle Silver

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Tata Bolt diesel review, test drive

Tata Bolt Price in India


They have been making trucks, SUVs and cars for many years now. The

popularity of these vehicles is in the exact order as mentioned. All

is well in Tata Motors except for a small change. They have become

young…again! As absurd it may sound, it is superbly true. They have

shrugged off their conventional approach and have become more Zesty

than ever.


Grab a daily or visit online and you shall see how the Zest is lapping

sales records and creating many in its course. The waiting period of

Zest has also gone up, a trouble which Tata Motors wanted to face for

a long time. Now that the Zest has got its feet fixed, it’s time for

its younger enthusiastic brother to step in. The elder, being the

matured one, is called the Zest while the younger one has a wild

streak and thus aptly called the Tata Bolt.


Paying attention to the demands of the young, the Bolt comes loaded

with many class rivaling features. Will this Bolt Strike leave the

competition in a state of complete discomfort? We reveal soon



Tata Bolt is based on the Vista platform, just like the Zest. Both are

twin siblings with a DNA similar to the Vista. To not go away from the

current design, Pratap Bose, Tata’s chief designer has evolved the

styling of the Bolt from the existing Vista design. If one notices

closely, it is the same shell like the Vista. This will be the new

design language for the coming Tata products; first we saw it in the

Zest and now in the Bolt.


The fascia of the Bolt retains a lot of similarity to the Vista, but

it does look fresh. It isn’t old or out-dated at any given point of

time. There is a chrome lip on the top of the front grille and

headlamps integrate well with this design. It looks like a smiling

front than an aggressive snout. It does have projector headlamps, but

it misses out on Move to the side and one can notice striking

similarity between the Vista and Bolt. The Bolt gets the blacked-out

pillars that give it a floating roof feel. The rear is a bit of

confusion for me, as it is floating but the round ends confuse me. The

new tail lamp design is compact and it does look stylish



If the exteriors don’t manage to convince you that the Bolt is a new

Tata, then the interiors certainly will, because apart from the

spacious cabin, the Bolt doesn’t share much with the Vista.


In fact, the all-new dashboard is similar to the Zest’s but, instead

of the sedan’s dual-tone scheme, the hatchback gets a sportier

all-black look. If you’re familiar with the Vista, you’ll find a big

step-up in quality, especially with the switchgear and some nicely

damped buttons on the centre console. However, some plastics, such as

those on the mirror casing and door pockets, have rough edges. Also,

the rear seatbelt’s retracting mechanism on our test car went bust

after a few uses, which is more worrying as it’s a sign that Tata’s

well-known quality niggles still persist.


Typical of Tata hatchbacks, you walk into the cabin and sit relatively

higher up in the driver’s seat. The front seats are generous and plush

but feel a touch too soft, and lack of support for the lower back can

lead to aches after a long drive. While finding a good driving

position is easy, taller drivers may find the tilt adjustable steering

blocking a chunk of the instrument cluster. Other ergonomic irritants

are a narrow footwell which leaves little place to rest your left foot

and the ‘Multi-Drive’ row of buttons which are set too low.

The Bolt’s strength, however, lies in the spacious rear bench. The

ample legroom rivals many mid-size sedans and thanks to the wide

cabin, passengers seated three abreast here won’t have to jostle for

shoulder room. Surprisingly though, while the front seats feel too

soft, the rear bench feels a bit too firm. Tata needs to give the

Bolt’s seats consistent foam density.


For convenience, there’s just a single cup holder in the front and an

open stowage in front of the gear lever to hold your phone. The top

trim also gets a storage tray under the front passenger’s seat –

useful to hide valuables when parked. That said, the lack of bottle

holders and slim door pockets hampers practicality and even the

210-litre boot isn’t particularly large; in fact, it’s around 10

percent smaller than the Vista’s.


Equipment, though, is what the Bolt has in abundance. The top XT trim

gets a Harman-sourced touchscreen interface that also doubles up as

the screen for climate control. In the Bolt, this infotainment screen

gets an upgraded firmware (vis-à-vis the Zest) that adds GPS

navigation through an Android phone. For better readability, the

screen’s contrast has been tweaked as well, but that hasn’t done much

to improve legibility in direct sunlight. Thankfully, you won’t have

to strain your eyes much as the infotainment system can read aloud

text messages and supports voice commands for dialling. Surprisingly

though, there isn’t a CD player but it supports most modern audio

sources such as Bluetooth, USB, iPods and aux. Sound quality from the

eight-speaker (four mid-range drivers and four tweeters) set-up sounds

great; most customers won’t be tempted to spring for an audio upgrade.



Tata officials only offered the petrol Bolt with manual transmission

for us to test drive. The diesel and the AMT (automatic) will have to

wait for a date closer to the launch next year.


The 1.2T, turbocharged, 4-cylinder Revotron engine is offered in

pretty much the same state of tune in the Bolt too. The powertrain

remains almost identical with the same TA65 gearbox also on offer in

the Bolt. But, compared to the Zest, the Revotron in the Bolt manages

to offer a slightly wider band of torque, despite the fact that the

peak continues to be the same 140Nm. Maximum power is the same 90PS

and though it peaks at 5,000rpm, power delivery from the engine is

very linear.


The Bolt shares the new light-weight chassis architecture with the

Zest and it becomes clear that it has helped the car massively, making

it nimbler and quicker. It is only a few kilos lighter than the Zest,

but Tata engineers have done an excellent job in boosting the ride

quality. Vibrations and noise have been extremely well contained

inside the cabin. Suspension geometry has been calibrated for keeping

the ride quality cushy on bad roads, though that didn’t mean that the

car bounced or bobbed about too much either. Body roll has also been

contained, though you tend to feel that there is a bit more lateral

movement due to the tall seating position.



Tata cars always score high on comfort and the same can be said about

the Bolt. Ride quality is excellent (a bit soft which results in some

bounciness at speed over bad roads), the vehicle takes everything in

its stride with utmost confidence and irons out bad roads like it’s

child’s play. Even bad roads don’t pose a threat to the Bolt and it

won’t be wrong to say that this is the best riding car in the

hatchback segment. Where Tata cars aren’t popular is the driving feel,

while they are neutral, they won’t make you rave about the handling,

the Bolt is a bit different here. Set-up to give you a good time

around the bends, the Bolt handles nicely and is eager to corner but

there is some body roll.


The new electric steering has good feel and decent feedback at speeds

(although it’s on the lighter side) which inspires confidence to drive

fast. We love the appearance of the 3-spoke steering wheel and the

size just fits in perfectly to make you feel at home. With 10 mm

smaller width of each tyre over the Zest, the Bolt still has plenty of

grip on offer and cornering really hard makes the acres of under-steer

make itself very evident. Stability at speed is excellent and braking

performance is also very good. Turning radius is a tad more than

rivals while ground clearance is more than adequate for our roads. The

Tata Bolt offers a fantastic blend in the dynamics department and is a

car you can actually have some fun driving.



Tata Motors has given the Bolt front airbags, ABS, EBD and Corner

Stability Control. Unlike its rivals from Japan and Korea, the Bolt

isn’t a light car and the heavy weight does make its presence felt as

you simply don’t feel like your driving a hatchback, the vehicle feels

robust. Yet to be tested by NCAP, we expect the Bolt to fare very well

but safety equipment on lower trims would be a nice touch. Tata Motors

is doing a lot to improve the service experience for its customers and

the same is reflecting already although such things take time.



After spending a day behind the wheel of the Bolt, we can say that the

Bolt lives up to the standards set by the Zest. It looks decent, is

spacious and rides pretty well too. In fact, Tata Motors has been

smart in changing the suspension setup as well as the steering feel,

thanks to which it is a lot more fun to drive and will appeal to a

slightly larger audience. Will it beat the competition? Well, a lot of

it will also depend on the pricing, but one thing’s for sure, Tata

Motors has once again got it right with the Bolt.


Tata Bolt Ex Showroom Price in New Delhi ranges from 4,63,449/- (Bolt XE Revotron 90PS Petrol) to  7,16,908/- (Bolt XT Quadrajet 75PS Diesel) .Tata Bolt has 8 Variants of Petrol are available in India. Tata Bolt comes in 5 colours, namely Venetian Red,Platinum Silver,Sky Grey,Pristine White,Dune Beige.

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Nissan Micra Review First Drive & Price in India




Nissan has been in India since a few years with limited products in their portfolio. Nissan’s range revolves around high end cars such as the Nissan Teana, Nissan X trail, and the recently launched sports car, the 370Z, all of which are imported as completely built units thereby justifying their price tags. India has emerged as the fastest growing automobile market in the world and the small car segment is boiling with almost unlimited options and Nissan adds another quality product to their portfolio in the form of the Nissan Micra, a small car which was perhaps the most awaited launch of the year. Nissan has high expectations from the Micra since it is the first of its mass production cars in India based on the all new ‘V Platform’. We drive the Nissan Micra and judge for ourselves.


The 2017 Nissan Micra will be designed on the Sway concept that was showcased at the Geneva Motor Show. Nissan states that the Sway has been designed to shake up the compact hatchback segment, traditionally a conservative sector of the market. With its swooping lines, striking nose, elegantly simple interior and bold use of sophisticated colours, the concept is a daring and emotional design. The new Micra has an aggressive styling which a departure from the current one. The headlamps are inward sloping ones that give it a mean look. It has has integrated LED DRLs. The large headlamps have a small front grille between them. The sloping roofline and the presence of a rear spoiler add to the sleek styling. The taillamps are sharp looking ones with a C-shaped illuminating pattern. The rear-end has an angular styling and the rear door handles are integrated into the upper partof the doors. It has classy looking 12-spoke, 16-inch alloy wheels. Earlier, the 2017 Nissan Micra had been spotted testing in Europe for the very first time. The new Micra has taken clues from the Sway concept showcased earlier. The V-shaped small grille is identical to the concept


; Accommodation itself, mind, is entirely adequate, especially given the Micra’s compact dimensions. There’s considerably more shoulder room than in its predecessor, decent enough rear accommodation and a boot that’s competitive in the sector. It’s an airy cabin, too, thanks to a low window line and large glass area. It remains a pity, though, that there isn’t more to surprise and delight in here. As we mentioned before there are four trim levels to choose from – Visia Limited Edition, Vibe, Acenta and n-tec. The entry-level models come with 14in steel wheels, speed-sensitive steering, Bluetooth and USB connectivity, six airbags and front electric windows, while upgrading to a Vibe specced Micra adds alloy wheels and air conditioning to the package. The mid-range Acenta trim equips the small Nissan with 15in alloys, a rear spoiler, cruise control, auto wipers and lights, and electric door mirrors, while the range-topping n-tec models come with 16in alloys, rear parking sensors and a 7.0in Nissan Connect touchscreen infotainment system.


The new facelifted Micra features the same two engines in the same state of tune. The 3-cylinder 1.2-litre petrol engine has seen a slightly bumped up peak power level (80 PS) in some other markets, but here it continues to offer the same 76 PS of peak power at 6,000 rpm and 104 Nm of peak torque from 4,000 rpm. The diesel engine is also the same 4-cylinder, 16-valve, 1,461cc mill that generates 64 PS of peak power and maximum torque of 160 Nm from a low 2,000 rpm. The only difference is that now the petrol version of the Micra is also being offered with an automatic transmission. The same CVT gearbox used in the Sunny XTRONIC CVT has been put to work in the Micra. This continuously variable transmission continues to be set at a high ratio of 7.2 and has been paired with the 1.2-litre engine to offer higher fuel efficiency than the 5-speed manual transmission version. Nissan claims that the new petrol CVT powertrain offers a mileage of 19.34 kmpl (Nissan internal estimates, not ARAI rated), whereas the manual transmission variant offers a mileage of 18.44 kmpl.


Shooting through traffic is an absolute joy thanks to all that power at hand and coupled with an extremely plush suspension setup the Micra simply gobbles up the roads no matter what the condition. On the highways though things change quite a bit. While the car can cruise pretty effortlessly at ton up speeds, it’s not really in its element when fast corners are brought into the picture. And then we come to the braking. Though adequate around town, braking hard results in immediate locking of the wheels. The culprit here are the non-ABS brakes. Why Nissan decided to omit a necessary safety feature like ABS is simply beyond us.


Like most Nissan car models, the hatchback is loaded with plenty of safety features such as driver airbag, central door locking with remote keyless entry, Follow-me-home lamps, engine immobilizer, an intelligent key with push button ignition of the car, seat belts, driver seat belt warning indicator, rear parking assistance, driver side power window with auto down feature etc. While the passenger airbag, side airbags with supplemental restraint system, ABS (anti-lock braking system) with EBD (electronic brake-force distribution), brake assist (BD) and immobilizer with alarm are available only on the top-end variant.


Luckily for Nissan, the general public will disagree with me and the new Micra will turn heads wherever it goes. On the inside, the new Micra is a much improved, much nicer place to be. It’s easy to see what Nissan has done; they’ve raided the Sunny parts bin to good effect. What this also means is that the price increase won’t be as much as we expect it to be. The Micra brand still has to establish itself in the Indian psyche, and the one thing holding it back is the quality of service that Nissan offers. If Nissan can fix that – and surprise us with the price – then we don’t see why you shouldn’t opt for the Micra.

Nissan Micra Xl Cvt Ex-showroom Price is   5,97,887/- and On Road Price is   6,42,244/- in New Delhi. Nissan Micra Xl Cvt comes in 6 colours, namely Sunshine Orange,Brick Red,Blade Silver,Storm White,Turqouise Blue,Onyx Black.EMI calculator for Nissan Micra.

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