SOME OF THE TOP KEY FACTORS THAT EVERY SUCCESSFUL WEB DESIGN NEEDS

Teamwork is so important. Growing up, every team sport and group project was touted as a “team-building experience” that we needed as we got older. As you entered the workforce, you realized that teamwork actually is as important as advertised in your youth.I believe teamwork is at its finest when you have a wide spectrum of very different roles come together. That is what attracted me to inbound marketing and web design in the first place. Just like basketball (or any other team sport), you have a set of individuals, each with their own specialty and role, working toward a common goal. For Digital Marketing Agency Check Vivid Digital 

 HERE ARE SOME OF THE TOP KEY FACTORS THAT EVERY SUCCESSFUL WEB DESIGN NEEDS ARE AS FOLLOWS :

UX Designer

An Agile web design process always begins with the team’s involvement in scoping and prioritizing elements of the project. Your team should always include a UX designer.The UX designer is like an architect and helps formulate the website strategy by conducting initial research on a client’s current website and analyzing it to help craft buyer personas, set goals and create a blueprint for the new website. Every step following the strategy is in place because of this role.

The designer is also responsible for bringing the pages to life using the wireframes created to mock up each page. The designer focuses on creating site concepts as well as developing templates and the graphic design for the website.The UX designer works in tandem with the team, and in particularly close collaboration with the content specialist.

Content Specialist

Content is such an important part of your website, but it doesn’t always get the attention that it deserves. Too often, the task of writing gets delegated to someone who is not a professional writer, which can cause poor conversions and project delays.

A great web design project needs to have someone spearheading content creation. This person should have experience in writing web content, educational marketing copy and persuasive conversion offers. In this role, the content specialist uses the personas for direction to create content for each page of your website.The content specialist should have an eye for detail and be able to use their writing to persuade your audience.

Marketing Strategist

The marketing strategist plays a key role in the long-term success of your website. This individual works to ensure the success of the client and their team. The marketing strategist sets expectations, makes sure the team and budget are on track, and works with the rest of the roles involved to set realistic deadlines for the web design project. This person routinely checks in with the team and helps team members overcome any obstacles, relaying information to the client as necessary, while also ensuring all project stakeholders stay on the same page.  SEO Companies in Hyderabad visit here page. 

The marketing strategist should also understand the latest internet trends and know how to optimize a website for the best conversion rates in the long term. Often, this person collaborates with the content specialist to create offers, blog posts and other content to attract and convert website visitors.The marketing strategist’s involvement doesn’t stop after the website launch. This individual focuses on bringing your ideal customers to the site and converting them into leads and sales. As such, the marketing strategist plays an important role in maximizing your website’s ROI.

Editor

It’s important to have a great editor as part of your website project. A professional editor ensures that everything on your website is working, complies with brand guidelines and is error-free. The editor tests workflows, calls-to-action, internal and external links, and more. The difference between having a nice website and a great, professional-looking website is often the work of a strong editor.

Website Developer

Strategy, content and design are all key, but without a team of developers to tie all those pieces together, your website will never be built. The website developer (or development team) uses the web strategy, content and design to build out the website. In this role, the developer builds out the code for the website, performs multiple tests and ensures any bugs or issues are dealt with accordingly. The backend developer builds the website.

Building a successful website takes teamwork. Trying to redesign your website without the expertise of the roles above can prove to be a difficult process, which may call for partnering with an agency.

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Some Of 9 Ideas To Instantly Making Your Website More User-Friendly

Websites have evolved into something so much more than just text and information on a page. Users today expect your website to entertain them, deliver quality and offer an intuitive, comfortable overall experience. Everything from the aesthetic of your site to the placement of your CTAs can impact how long visitors stay on your page. Fortunately, it is easy to make your website more user-friendly.

Here are 9 ideas to get you started on making your website more user-friendly are as follows :

1. Accept online orders

Online shopping is a way of life now. People don’t like to be limited by store hours or location and don’t want to be bothered to have to go somewhere or call someone to place an order. Promo Search has full e-commerce capabilities, so visitors can easily place an order directly on your site. This gives your clients the freedom to do business when and where they want. It also expands your list of potential clients to the World Wide Web. Digital Marketing Companies in Hyderabad visit Vivid Digital

2. Improve Your Site Layout

Keep in mind that many users are now accessing websites via mobile devices. About 80% of internet users own a smartphone and they are spending more and more time accessing the Internet via their phones, especially as data costs come down and unlimited data is the standard.With that in mind, having a responsive layout becomes even more critical. Does your site look good on both desktop and mobile? It doesn’t necessarily have to look the same. It is more important that mobile users can see things without having to zoom in every few seconds and navigate easily throughout the site.

3 ..Make content easy to skim

People rarely read anything word for word, but they’re more likely to read and understand the content on your website if it’s clear and concise. The best way to do this is by employing bulleted lists. That way, your website visitors can easily skim your website for the information they’re looking for.

4 Pay Attention to CTAs

Do you have strong calls to action (CTAs) on your pages in locations that make sense? Site visitors who decide to buy or register for your newsletter want to know how to take the next step. Make this simple by using a strong CTA that’s easy to locate.Look at what payment processing platform Square does with their CTA button. They consider both a color that will pop against the background and even the wording of the CTA, which simply reads “sign up with Square.” They have also chosen to place the CTA button above the fold and additional information underneath. This allows the user to find the button from the minute he lands on the page.

5 Add search functionality

Have you ever been on a company’s website and left out of frustration because you were unable to find what you were looking for? Don’t let this happen to your web visitors! Adding search functionality makes it easy for visitors to quickly find exactly what they’re looking for.

6 Beef Up Your Contact Page

If you don’t have a straightforward way for consumers to contact you, you risk losing the trust of those who land on your page. About 51% of people state they believe complete contact information is something many websites are missing. If your contact is simply an email, consider beefing up this information. The more ways you allow a user to contact you, the better. Consider adding a toll-free number, a live chat option, a knowledge base, and user forum. These factors all add credibility to your site. For SEO Services Check here

7 Include your social media icons

A strong social media presence is a must for businesses who want to be successful now and in the future. If you have active social media accounts, add them to your website to grow your following. Your web visitors will love being able to connect with you in this less formal environment and you can keep them up to date on specials, hot new products and more via your social channels.

8 Choose Color Carefully

Choose the colors for your website carefully. You need a perfect balance between beauty and clarity. Not only does your color palette need to make sense for your industry, but the contrast between the background and text needs to be enough that the visitor can read text easily and not strain the eyes.Look at the bold colors the Van Gogh Museum uses on its website. The pop of red and the vibrant colors in the painting used for the background draw the eye of the user. Because the industry is art, the site can get a little more creative in the colors they use, combining colors for a palette that a more conservative industry, such as banking, wouldn’t use. This combination works well for this particular site. Although the white text on the partial cream background does not work well, the rest of the site is spot on.

9 Don’t make someone pick up a phone to get information

The more digitally dependent people become, the less we like having to do something as manual as making a phone call. Most of your visitors’ questions will be about products. They’ll want to know the material, the available colors, the imprint size and countless more answers. You could manually add all of this information and make sure you’re continuously keeping it up to date. Or you can use PromoSearch and all of the products from the SAGE database will automatically be added to your site, along with all of the product information.

Make Your Website User-Friendly

These eight things will instantly make your website more user-friendly, but the key to a site with good UX is to make improvements consistently. Take the time to ask your customers what tools would help them and add those to your site. Remember, the tools that are useful for an ecommerce site will differ from those that are useful for a blog.Test everything and try to see your site through the eyes of your target audience. Eventually, your site will become easier to use for your particular site visitors and potentially lead to more sales or new clients.

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12 Rules for Professional JavaScript in 2016

Cory House

Disclaimer: I speak in absolutes below for brevity. Yes, nearly every “rule” in programming has exceptions.

JavaScript is hard. It moves so fast that it’s often unclear whether you’re “doing it wrong” at any given moment. Some days it feels like the bad parts outweigh the good parts.Yet there’s no point in fighting it. JavaScript is eating the world. So we might as well do it right.

Here’s my take.

1. JS Belongs in a .js File “C’mon, it’s only a few lines…” Yes, I mean nearly all*. Why? Because it aids readability, enforces structure, and saves bandwidth. Inline JavaScript must be downloaded every time the page is loaded. In contrast, separate .js files are cached. As you’ll see, this rule helps support a long list of other rules below. That’s why it’s rule #1.

2. JS Code Should be Static I’ve seen many creative hacks for making JavaScript dynamic. People use server-side languages like C#, Ruby, or Java to write dynamic JavaScript in a string. Don’t do that. You lose code coloring, syntax highlighting, and intellisense support. And remember, JavaScript belongs in a .js file (see rule #1).

Instead, use JSON to introduce dynamic behavior. I call this the JavaScript Configuration Object Pattern. Here’s how: inject JSON into the head of your application and utilize that data to fork logic as needed. You might be thinking “Hey, this contradicts rule 1!” I view JSON as data, not code, so I make an exception here in order to support static, separate JavaScript files. For Top web design company visit Vivid Designs

StackOverflow uses this pattern. As does Google. So you’re in good company. Just view their source:

As you can see, StackOverflow is injecting personal settings like isNoticesTabEnabled. This simple snippet of JSON provides the necessary data for providing custom behaviors while using static JavaScript code files. To make this happen, serialize a server-side class into JSON and place the result in <head>. Then you can reference this data structure as needed in your static JavaScript code, knowing it will be available because it’s injected in the <head>.

3. JS Should be Minified Minifying reduces file sizes, which speeds page loads. Remember, performance is a feature. And of course, to minify, you need to place JavaScript in a separate file (Again, rule #1). Minification was once a hassle. Today, it’s automated and simple. There’s a dozen ways to get it done, but Gulp with gulp-uglify is a low-friction and automated way to get rolling.

4. JS Should Be Linted Real-time Linting enforces style guidelines, finds typos, and helps avoid errors. There’s a variety of linters out there, but I suggest ESLint. You can run it via Gulp with gulp-eslint. Gulp can watch all your JS files and run the linter everytime you hit save. Oh, and again, you need your JS in a separate .js file to lint it. Starting to see why I made “JS should be in a separate file” rule #1?

5. JS Should Have Automated Tests We understood testing was important on the server years ago. But it’s been largely ignored in JavaScript until fairly recently. Today’s typical JavaScript application has more surface area than you can practically test regularly by hand. With JavaScript handling so much logic, it’s critical to have automated tests.

You can do automated integration testing via tools like Selenium. However, integration tests are often brittle, so I suggest focusing on automated unit testing. There’s a variety of options for automated unit testing. I suggest Jasmine if you’re new to JavaScript testing and Mocha with Chai if you want the ultimate configurability.

6. JS Should Be Encapsulated We learned the risks of global variables years ago. Thankfully, there are many ways to encapsulate JavaScript these days:

Immediately Invoked Function Expressions (aka IIFE) Revealing Modules AMD (typically via RequireJS) CommonJS (used by Node.js, use in browser via Browserify or Webpack) ES6 modules Bottom line, ES6 Modules are the future. The great news is, although they’re not yet supported in browsers, you can use ES6 modules today if you transpile via Babel (and as you’ll see below, you should).

If you don’t want to transpile, CommonJS is likely your best bet for today. Since Node uses the CommonJS pattern, you can use npm to pull down 1,000’s of packages. CommonJS doesn’t run in the browser without a shim, so you’ll want to use a tool that packages it for the browser like Browserify, Webpack, or JSPM.

7. JS Dependencies Should Be Explicit This rule closely relates to the rule above. Once you’ve started encapsulating your JavaScript, you need an easy way to reference other modules. That’s the beauty of modern module systems like CommonJS and ES6 modules. You simply specify your dependencies at the top of the file, much like an import or using statement in Java or C#. JavaScript has finally grown up.

8. Transpile to JS The latest version of JavaScript, EcmaScript 2015 (more commonly known as ES6) was officially released in June. Browsers still lack support for most of the new features, but that doesn’t matter. You can enjoy the long list of new features today using Babel. Babel transpiles ES6 to ES5. And assuming you can live with some performance quirks, you can enjoy the new features today. JavaScript is expected to release new versions once a year now, so we’re likely to be transpiling forevermore. Transpiling gives us the future today. Best web development company in Amritsar

Or perhaps you love the comfort of strong types? Then consider TypeScript which compiles down to JavaScript.

Bottom line is this:

You don’t have to write ES5 anymore. Consider using an abstraction that gives you extra power. 9. JS Should Have an Automated Build We’ve already talked about linting, minification, transpilation, and testing. But how do you make all this happen automatically? Simple: With an automated build that watches files. Again, Gulp is a popular tool to tie all this together via its watch function, but Grunt and Webpack are other excellent options to consider. Or, if you’re a whiz at Bash you can simply use npm as a build tool. The point is, don’t expect people to remember to run these things manually. Automate and enjoy the benefits!

10. Use a Framework or Libraries Pull something awesome off the shelf and get rolling. Need to stay light? Try Backbone or Knockout. Or maybe plain ‘ol jQuery is enough. Want something more full-featured and opinionated? Try, Angular, Ember, or React with Flux.

The point is:

Do not attempt to start from scratch. Stand on the shoulders of giants. React with Flux is my current favorite combo for client-side dev. That’s why I just published a comprehensive Pluralsight course on the topic. In the course I walk through a build process that implements many of the practices above. The starter kit is on Github.

Regardless of which framework you pick, make sure to separate your concerns. Which leads to the next point…

11. JS Should Separate Concerns It’s easy to get in the habit of placing all JavaScript in a single file, or to blindly follow the advice of your framework. Don’t forget the lessons you’ve learned on the server when you move to the client.

By separating concerns, I don’t mean merely separating models, views and controllers like you do in MV* style frameworks like Angular and Knockout. I’m saying this:

Think like a server-side developer when writing JavaScript. Separate your presentation from your business logic and data access. This means AJAX calls should all be in one spot. Create a centralized client-side “data access layer”. This also means logic that doesn’t have to be part of the presentation layer framework you choose should reside in separate “POJOs” (Plain ‘ol JavaScript objects). Business logic modules should contain plain JavaScript — in other words, no framework specific code should reside inside. This makes the logic easy to reuse, easy to test, and it’s not impacted when you decide to move from Angular to the hot new flavor of the month.

12. Use a Starter Kit That’s a lot to keep track of. And it’s silly to start out each new project with a blank slate. Instead, sit down with your team and decide how you want to build JavaScript projects. Build a starter kit that implements a simple example so everyone has a clear, shared vision on how to get things done.

A starter kit should include linting, minification, bundling, a production build, and a few example automated tests. I suggest including a simple example app that puts this all to use. Then provide a command that removes the starter kit and places the project in a state that’s ready for development.

My starter kit is React Slingshot. I build this starter kit from scratch in my new course “Building Applications in React and Redux in ES6”.

And even though my starter kit is specific to React, if you’re in Angular, Backbone, etc, the core principles and features remain relevant. That said, be sure to Google for other starter kits for inspiration.

So why use a starter kit? A starter kit creates a pit of success. It makes following your team’s agreed list of best practices automatic. A good starter kit makes doing the right thing the easy thing.

Well, That Was Overwhelming. Yes it was.

We’ve entered an era where the front-end is complicated enough that we need front-end specialists. Don’t expect everyone on your team to understand how to do all this in detail. Agree on a starter kit that codifies all your decisions. This way, everyone can start with the same solid foundation on your next project.

See things missing? Disagree? Chime in on Reddit.

Cory House is the author of multiple Pluralsight courses including “Building Applications with React and Flux”, “Building Applications in React and Redux in ES6” and “Clean Code: Writing Code for Humans”. He is a Software Architect at Vinsolutions and trains software developers internationally on software practices like front-end development and clean coding. Cory is a Microsoft MVP, and founder of outlierdeveloper.com.

 

 

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Meta Skills of a Software Engineer

Doug Arcuri

Recently, a friend asked a question about the particular skills possessed by software engineers.

What are the unique skills that software engineers practice? Drawing from my experience led me to an opinion. The idea I have come to realize over time is that I enjoy the meta of programming. The skill of learning the meta, or how to do what we do better, includes reading many well known books in context. I took specific examples of what I read over the years, applied it to my own observations practicing in the field and I answered in a way that I believed was most pragmatic.

Me: In my opinion, if we think universally, I would say it is the practice of correctness and pattern recognition*. These are some of the skills that are unique to software engineers. Let’s exam these skills to add context.

Correctness Correctness is very much related to the how and why we build things the way we do. In organizations, it is most closely associated to the correctness of what the business must solve for its customers. Software that is written well follows this thinking. If you are looking for Best Website development services check Vivid Designs

Correctness is seen in engineering as how correct the how is so that the solution for business can continue to be solved with high reliability. It is and must be a balance of strategy (designing) and tactics (execution). The examination of the how’s how in a vacuum appears well in chapter four of Programming Pearls — Writing Correct Programs.

… keeping code simple is usually the key to correctness. — Jon Bentley Pattern Recognition Pattern recognition is strongly tied to the organization of that correctness by creating the necessary abstractions and component boundaries. Pattern recognition leads to concepts of reuse to modularize and isolate code. We monitor duplication, find areas that can be reused, and refactor complicated parts of code. It is what software engineers do well. Our attention to that detail is vigilant. We recognize knowledge as it is created over and over again. Then we simplify.

Pattern recognition is discussed at length in the community and there are many sources to read up on their techniques. The origins where I learned about this skill reside in chapter two of The Pragmatic Programmer — The Evils Of Duplication.

Make it easy to reuse. DRY — Don’t Repeat Yourself. — Andrew Hunt & Dave Thomas A Teachable Moment Once I gave this response, my friend followed up with another question.

If correctness and pattern recognition are these skills, how do you teach them? Of course, my answer was simple enough.

Me: Locate these books, set the environment, and work through by showing examples. Set the expectation of learning and practicing these meta skills while delivering value to business. Why? Complexity. This is the best investment of learning the skill of balancing complexity that I know of. It also results in engineers who become more confident over time. My mentoring has been focused around these books and around these particular skills. But it made me realize there are few out there that invest heavily in the meta, apart from doing the work without realizing it. The vocabulary of the meta is something I’ve have interest in. My writings on problem decomposition (correctness), and organization (pattern recognition) in the real world were difficult to see when in the heat of delivery. If you are looking for Web development company in Bangalore check Vivid Designs

At about the same time I had thought about writing this brief on these skills, another book was mentioned because I’d been asking around. A professor at Stanford has been teaching a course on the meta and has resulted in a book of some of his course findings. I was shocked when I found out that he has the same gripe as me, I purchased the book and devoured it. From chapter thirteen, A Philosophy Of System Design.

Engineers tend to be very detailed oriented. We love details and are good at managing lots of them; this is essential for being a good engineer. But, great software designers can also step back from the details and think about a system at a higher level. — John Ousterhout** Conclusion In my opinion, correctness and pattern recognition are skills*** that software engineers should strive to understand and do well at. The result is higher quality software. All other unique skills, if there are others to categorize, may very well be based off these. I invite others to share examples of meta skills they have practiced over time.

Fundamentally, correctness and pattern recognition have tie-ins to outcomes of complexity (also known as cognitive load). There needs to be a way to balance both intelligently so that the complexity is mitigated. In essence this is why these skills are, in my opinion, the distillation of what we do.

* What is interesting about correctness and pattern recognition is they also have a strong association to practices around machine learning.

** If you want to know more about what John is doing, take a look at his video.

*** Engineers should also practice high levels of learning and communication. These concepts aren’t unique to software, but have strong associations to the sciences.

 

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Are web design contracts necessary?

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In the first installment of the Project Manager’s Guide to Extraordinary Projects, we discussed initial client interactions and how to choose the best client for your company.

Now that you have found that perfect client, you’re ready to dive headfirst into an exciting new project. But wait, there is one last thing you need in place before you start wireframing, open up Sketch, or write that first line of code. The contract.

Unless you are a lawyer, the contract phase is probably the least exciting stop on the road to an extraordinary project. At times I liken the contract stage to waiting on the tarmac at the airport after you’ve boarded the plane and about to take off for a week long vacation. You’re bursting with energy, excited to start living it up. Just then, the captain comes on the loud speaker and says your flight will be delayed due to inclement weather.

Web design contracts and negotiations can be tedious and can dampen the energy of a project. However, they are crucial to success and will protect you and your company if things take a wrong turn during the project.

Are web design contracts necessary? Absolutely! The goal of a contract is to protect both parties in the event that someone doesn’t hold up their end of the bargain. We all wish we could take people at their word. But the reality is you need to take steps to make sure you’re covered if disaster strikes.

Even if you’re doing a small project for a familiar client or even a friend, a signed contract reminds everyone — including you — that this is still a professional business arrangement. For web design company services visit Vivid Designs

Here at 45royale, instead of getting bummed out about having to sort through all the contract’s legal jargon, we look at it as another opportunity to strengthen our relationship with our client.

First off, taking the time to draw up a contract that outlines terms of your agreement can show a client that you are serious and invested in the project’s success. They know you’ll deliver because if you don’t, the contract says you won’t get paid. Simple as that.

Secondly, outlining a project’s scope, requirements, and deliverables in a contract can set everyone’s expectations. The client knows what to expect from you. And you’ll know that they’ll be providing feedback on your work and paying you when they say they will.

When both parties are secure in their arrangement and free of worry and doubts, you’d be amazed at the kind of creativity and energy that can be generated at the start of a project. Where do I get a contract? Now that you are aware of the importance of a contract, what do you do if you don’t have one? If you’re just starting out doing freelance work or thinking about starting your own company it’s likely you don’t have a standard contract.

Many sites on the internet offer standard contracts that you can download for free. Sites like AIGA.org have web design contracts that you can download in PDF form and can even include helpful tips about customizing a standard contract to fit your needs.

However, if you’re going to be negotiating a contract more than once, its probably best to help you with a web design contract that suits your needs.

Use my contract, no use mine Once you are armed with a solid contract you can feel more confident about entering into an arrangement with a client. Some companies don’t have consulting agreements already drawn up, so having yours handy can certainly save some time.

But what do you do if your client has a standard contract of their own?

More often than not established companies will come to the table with a standard contract already in hand. While this is expected, you need to be aware that the terms of your client’s contract could be structured in their favor.

As a result you need to review any agreement closely before signing on the dotted line. In particular, web design contracts with larger corporations are usually very detailed and lengthy. It’s quite likely that they have an entire legal department drawing up said contracts. If you are looking for Web development company in Bangalore check Vivid Designs 

Bottom line — if you’re not a lawyer, don’t pretend to be one.

If you’re unsure what a particular clause or section in a legal document means, don’t sign it until you’ve asked your client for clarification and/or had the document reviewed by a lawyer.

The saga continues… While contract delays can stall a project, it’s important that you do your best to protect your business and your work. Once you have your agreement in place you can actually start producing and making your client’s vision a reality.

You both came up with a plan, signed an agreement to work together, and now its time to execute. Well don’t just stand there, get to work!

In Part 3 of the Project Managers Guide to Extraordinary Projects we cover two things that will either make your project or break it. That’s right, we’ll be talking about creating a project schedule and setting project milestones.

Did you like that article? Sign up for our weekly newsletter and we’ll send a new one to you every Friday. 🙌 When you subscribe to our newsletter, you’ll get the inside scoop on all the latest happenings around the 45royale camp. More importantly, we’ll send you resources to help refine your own design and development process, harness agility in your creativity, and stay inspired to meet your work with fresh eyes. Sound good? Giddyup!

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Setting Up Your Business for Address and Phone

In the past, clients and consumers were wary of businesses operating from their homes. Knowing this, many home business owners sought ways, many of which were expensive, to hide the fact they worked home. They’d obtain a box at a local mail store and hire an answering service. Today, home based businesses are normal and only a few clients or consumers question it. Further, the options to create a professional identity, have become more affordable.

Setting Up Your Business Address and Phone

Before determining your address and phone, you should decide your business name. Once you know your name and how you plan to set up your business structure (i.e. sole proprietor or LLC), you’ll need to decide on your address and phone. You’ll use this contact information on your business license and other official business documents. You’ll also put it on your business cards, contracts, and other marketing tools.

Business Address Options

Today it’s not considered unprofessional to use your home address; however, you may want to protect your privacy. Your address will be used in many documents, and online, and you may not want that to be public knowledge. For example, the CAN-SPAM law requires that your address be in all your emails. There are two options if you’d like a different address. One is to open a post office box with the US Postal Service.The second is to get a box at a local mail store, such as and UPS store. PO boxes are considerably less expensive than private mail boxes. However, your decision may in part depend on the image you’re trying to project for your business. Some prospects may view your use of a PO box address for your business as meaning it’s small or not fully established, or that you operate a “fly by night” company from your garage.The mail store option can give the appearance of a business with a physical address, that might make some consumers more at ease working with you over seeing a P.O. Box. With a mail service, your address is the mail services address plus you box number. For example: 123 Elm Street, #123. This looks more like a location than P.O. Box 123.

Business Phone Options

Even 100 percent online businesses need a phone. While your clients or customers may not call you, you’ll need it for other reasons, such as for the services you use (i.e. web hosting). Many home business owners start off using their current phone, but there are several advantages to setting up a business line.

1 You can keep business and personal separate. When your phone rings, you don’t want to worry that your child is answering a client call. When a business line rings, you know it’s business, and when your personal phone rings, you know its personal.

2 Phone related tax deductions are easier to track. The IRS doesn’t like comingling of your personal and business accounts. If you use your personal phone, you can only deduct the direct business expenses.

Landline Options

Before cell phones, having a business phone was fairly limited.

You could either add a second number (distinctive ring service) to your existing phone, or have a second line added to your home. The latter option is more expensive, but it is also entirely deductible on your taxes. Using your existing line, you can only deduct business-related services (i.e. distinctive ring).

Cell Phone Options

Today, having a cell phone is easy and allows you to be accessible when you’re not in the office (which can be a good or bad thing depending on how much you work). Like your landline, you can get a business number to your existing phone service, or use an online service to create a business line that forwards to your cell phone.

 

 

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Rolls Royce Phantom Review,Features,Specifications & Price In Bangalore

OVERVIEW ;

The Rolls-Royce Phantom is offered as a Phantom sedan, the Phantom Coupe, the Drophead Coupe (convertible), and the Phantom extended wheelbase sedan (EWB). All four body styles use the same 453-hp, 531-lb-ft of torque V-12 mated to an eight-speed automatic. All four body styles are rear-wheel drive and deliver the same EPA-rated fuel economy numbers, 11/19 mpg city/highway. Rolls-Royce claims that these nearly 6,000-pound behemoths can hit 60 mph in 5.6 seconds for the Phantom Coupe and Drophead Coupe, and 5.7 seconds for the Phantom sedan and Phantom EWB. Get detail features, specs and price of Rolls Royce Cars in Carzprice

The Rolls-Royce Phantom is one of the most customizable vehicles on the market; the automaker claims there are over 44,000 hues to choose from. Once you choose from the almost endless exterior and interior color and style combinations, you can have your door sills, glove box lid, and headrests customized with the text of your choice. Your Phantom’s Spirit of Ecstasy hood ornament can be gold plated, in solid silver, or illuminated. When you are done choosing from a host of different veneers, Rolls-Royce offers some of the most luxurious options in the industry: a humidor in the glove box, an electric rear curtain, lambswool floor mats, a small refrigerator that holds two champagne bottles, milled aluminum cup holders, and a cabinet to hold your glassware. Once you are ready to exit from the lap of luxury, Rolls-Royce has you covered with more luxurious options: a beautifully handcrafted picnic basket, portable leather trimmed insulated bag, leather-trimmed luggage compartment, wooden luggage compartment floor, a six-piece handmade luggage set, and a bumper protection apron.

DESIGN AND STYLE ;

In what would be typical of a facelift from other manufacturers, what we see with the Phantom VIII is a lot of the same, but plenty of new at the same time. Overall, the car still has the same generally boxy design and, if you were to look at just a silhouette of the VII next to the VIII, you wouldn’t be able to spot the difference. But, what’s important to remember here is that the little subtleties make all the difference. Rolls took the time to construct the aluminum body in a way that closes the gap at the seams as much as possible, with the only noticeable gaps in the body resulting from the doors themselves. All other seams between body parts have a clearance so tight that you can’t see them at a glance or have been integrated in such a way that you can’t tell they are there. The other big note on this front is the way the grille is now integrated into the nose. Instead of being a separate unit, it’s part of the front fascia.

To the untrained eye, the front end might not look all that different, but there’s actually a lot going on here. First off, those two central vents below the grille have been replaced by a slightly recessed area for the front license plate, while the air dam and corner vents are all now one big piece with a honeycomb mesh for extra character. Those weird horizontal driving lights from the outgoing model have also disappeared and in their place is a smaller set of vents, one on each corner, that provides a look of depth and some mild aggressiveness – something that could attract the younger wealthy crowd. As we move higher in the front end, you’ll notice that the nose itself sits higher, raising the Spirit of Ecstacy emblem higher than on the outgoing model. The headlights are smaller and sleeker than before, and also recessed into the fascia by a couple of inches. Inside, them, you’ll find integrated LED running lights as well as the “most advanced” laser headlight system that is said to project light nearly 2,000 feet down the road, illuminating even the darkest of nights. Finally, the sharp body lines of the hood have been moved further inward, and the hood has a taller presence, really accenting the new grille quite nicely.

Moving over to the side profile, the changes are a lot less obvious, but they are there. For instance, the slope to the rear end, where the rear windscreen is, is designed at a larger angle, which should make it a little more aerodynamic. You can’t even make out the fuel filler door in the C-Pillar, and the stationary glass behind the rear door is now a bit larger at the bottom with rounded corners. The chrome trim here has also grown a bit wider, and matches the door handles, but isn’t all the gaudy, really. The lower half of the body did actually change quite a bit. For instance, those dramatic body lines below the belt line have been smoothed out and are barely visible. This adds a bit of mystery to the side, but also gives a sense of cleanliness. Further down, the side skirts are now the same height from front to rear, and a gentle body line runs from the front wheel well toward the rear, where it blends into the body just past the central door seam. The wheel wells are also significantly toned down, now featuring just a light defining the line at the top. It’s a very attractive look, indeed.

Around back, you’ll find even more changes. As you can see, the rear quarters are bubblier than before and don’t sit quite as far below the rear deck. And, because of the unique angle of the rear glass, it’s also got a slight curvature to it while to rounded corners of the top adds just a bit of extra character. The license place recess is now a bit deeper in the deck lid, while the chrome trim above has grown a bit to overlap the recess and takes on a 3D look – it’s a nice touch really. Down below, the rounded rear fascia and slightly concave corners are the only character to speak of aside from the chrome trim that sits just below the deck lid. The exhaust outlets haven’t changed in shape but look to be just a bit wider. Finally, the most important change here is the taillights. Those old, dated units of the Series II VII are long gone and have been replaced by sleeker modernized units that feature an all-new matrix. The taillight portion is made up of the outermost edges, while the inner portion is reserved for brake light functions. In the center of each sits a tiny LED reverse light to go with the Rolls-Royce emblem in the center. Get On Road price of Rolls Royce Phantom from Rolls Royce Dealers in Bangalore at Carzprice

CABIN AND COMFORT ;

Rolls-Royce’s signature ‘coach doors’ or rear doors hinged at the back, open wide for easy access into a cabin that is truly fit for a king. Seated in the rear, I shut the electrically operated doors with the touch of a button (the chauffer can do it from the outside as well) to hermetically seal me off from the outside world.You can spend the whole day inside a Phantom just soaking up the unadulterated luxury oozing out of every pore. There’s richness in every small detail; right from the deep-pile carpets, the exquisitely stitched leather trim and fine-grain wood, to the soft leather seats with the feather-filled headrests. Seat comfort is something you won’t complain about even in the standard-wheelbase Phantom, which has an abundance of legroom, while the extended version has an excess of it to the point that I can sit with my legs fully stretched-out. You sit nice and high in the sumptuous rear seats, which can be amply reclined. The sofa-like seats will heat or cool your backside and even massage you. This latter function is what I discovered accidentally and in the process also exposed a minor design flaw.

My knee would knock a button on the switch panel on the door, which inadvertently activated the massage function. This kept happening a couple of times which made me wonder why the cluster of switches couldn’t have been moved forward. Koehn has received this feedback and is well aware that the switch placement, directly in line with a passenger’s knee, is not optimal but says. “Moving it forward would make passengers stretch to reach them.” And that’s when you realise how much thought has gone into making the switchgear fall easily to hand. You don’t have to stretch or bend to reach any of the switches (and crease your suit or gown by doing so) but simply sit back, close the doors via the button on the C-pillar, and activate the air con, stereo and all the seat functions via the rotary dial cluster in the centre console of the arm rest. Even the small table and individual entertainment screens flip down with press of an easily accessible button. The switches themselves are wonderfully damped, as are the traditional organ-stop plungers that control the air flow. You also get a coolbox complete with a pair of champagne flutes.

Upfront, the seats aren’t as lavish as the back but they are hugely comfortable and come with a wide range of adjustments. For the first time on a Rolls, the front doors too can be electrically closed with the touch of a button, which relieves the front occupants from the undignified task of stretching out for the door handle. The Y-spoke steering wheel is as massive as ever but now comes with a plethora of buttons. Also giving a nod to modernity is the digital instrument cluster, which replace the analogue dials, and a heads-up display for the driver.The ‘starlight’ roof is a special Rolls-Royce feature that only covered half of the roof in the previous phantom, but now on the new car it runs all the way to back. The extended Phantom has a whopping 1,344 fibre optic lights randomly scattered in the headliner. The electrical architecture allows each of these lights to be individually controlled, allowing Rolls-Royce to give you your own customised constellation! But while Rolls-Royce can promise you the stars, it can’t give you the sun or the moon. There is no sunroof, not even as an option, in the new Phantom.

ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION ;

All four variants of this coupe series are fitted with a powerful and dynamic 6.7-litre petrol engine, which comes with a displacement capacity of 6749cc. It is integrated with twelve cylinders and provide a power packed performance along with decent acceleration and pick up. This engine has the ability to churn out a whopping power output of 453bhp at 5350rpm in combination with a hammering torque of 720Nm at just 3500rpm, which is rather decent for Indian road and traffic conditions. This powerful and strong engine has been intelligently mated with eight speed automatic transmission gear box, which makes sure that the drive and ride for driver and passengers is smooth and inspiring. This engine makes use of direct fuel injection and is driven by wire design via valvetronic technology.

Its power plant is incorporated with an advanced direct injection fuel supply system, which allows the vehicle to deliver about 4.7 Kmpl in the city traffic conditions. At the same, under standard driving conditions on the bigger roads it gives out 9.5 Kmpl approximately.This powerful 6.7-litre petrol engine has the ability of churning out a maximum power 453bhp at 5350rpm in combination with a peak torque output of 720Nm at just 3500rpm, which is quite good for Indian road and traffic conditions.With the help of an eight speed automatic transmission gear box, this motor allows the vehicle to attain a maximum speed in the range of 240 to 250 Kmph, which is rather incredible for this segment. At the same time, it can cross the speed mark of 100 Kmph in close to 5.9 seconds from standstill that is rather thrilling for the occupants sitting inside.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

The wheel is a tad thicker than before, and there’s fully electric power steering, but the mode of operation remains the same for the chauffeurs among you: slide the delicate little column stalk into ‘D’, apply the merest suggestion of pressure to the throttle pedal, and ease away in such a manner as not to rustle the copy of Pork Belly Futures Digest that’s being mulled over in the rear compartment. Otherwise you’ll be mulling over your P45.And it does actually handle. Or more accurately it can handle, should you elect to lean on it. But even with a (heavily revised) version of Rolls’s 6.6-litre twin-turbo V12 – it’s 6.75 litres in capacity here, and makes 563bhp – it feels inappropriate to trouble the power reserve gauge any more than is strictly necessary (no rev counter in here, of course). Which, given that you’re surfing along on a huge wave of torque, 664lb ft from 1,700rpm, is mostly never.The essence of a Rolls-Royce is a driving – travelling – experience that is beyond even that summoned up by the plushest Mercedes S-Class or BMW 7 Series. You don’t notice things as humdrum as gearchanges (the Phantom uses ZF’s silken eight-speed transmission), and you only notice really awful road surfaces. If you’re in the back, you don’t notice much at all. Which is the point: in a Phantom, silence isn’t just golden, it’s omnipresent.

SAFETY FEATURES ;

Phantom has a unique and advanced body frame which is made of 500 separate parts attached. Each part is made of aluminium which is light and phenomenally strong. Apart from its strong built; Phantom has many other quality features like front airbags, side airbags, overhead airbags, knee airbags, seatbelt pretensions and anti-whiplash system all aiming at giving a better security to the passengers while on the road or in any unfortunate incident.The front and the rear wheels of Phantom have ventilated disc brakes with brake assist and traction control.

BOTTOMLINE ;

Admittedly, I wasn’t too impressed with what we had seen up to the debut. The spy shots and teasers left me really wanting more. But, one has to remember that this is Rolls-Royce we’re talking about and extreme makeovers aren’t exactly its forte. And, while the changes to each segment of the car are far from revolutionary, collectively, the Phantom VIII is a huge improvement over its predecessor. There’s enough new outside to keep it fresh, and the refinement of the interior is more than adequate. Most of the work came into play under the skin, where the supporting bits and pieces really tie the car together as a whole. So, while there isn’t a huge difference between the Phantom VIII and the Phantom VII, there’s enough to keep those wealthy enough to afford one more than happy. You just can’t get luxury like this in too many places, you know? Apply car loan for Rolls Royce Phantom at Carzprice

 

 

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Tata Hexa Specifications,Features & Performance

OVERVIEW ;

The Tata Hexa has been a much awaited vehicle from Tata and had the industry talking before its launch. It was earlier shown as a concept at Geneva Motor Show in 2015. The Tata Hexa is one of the successful vehicles from Tata in recent times and has successfully wooed buyers as well, with some intelligent positioning. We review the Tata Hexa in detail and tell you whether it is worth buying. Read further.

DESIGN ;

Even though it replaces an MPV, the Hexa doesn’t look like one. Tata has given it a muscular and aggressive styling. The bonnet is heavily sculpted, there are smoked out projector headlamps, the grille is wide & highlighted with chrome and the bumper integrates LED daytime running lights. You will notice flared wheel arches on the side profile along with the neat looking 19-inch alloy wheels. These are the biggest wheels available in this segment. The black cladding adds to the rugged appeal of the Hexa.

The side profile might remind you of the Aria with its silhouette but Tata has cleverly reworked some details to cover the MPV proportions. The rear profile gets a heavy dose of chrome on the tail gate with LED tail lights while the bumper gets a skid plate and dual exhaust setup. The tail section might look a tad simple compared to the rest of the styling but it will grow on you with time.

CABIN ;

Let’s first talk about what’s changed the least on the inside – the space. It’s a big car so it has a big room, right? Well, not quite. Its beefy body-on-frame construction eats up a lot of space when compared to a similarly-sized SUV with a monocoque chassis. Still, there’s more than ample room for five; it’s just that the last row is best for two people only. Boot space is surprisingly good with all the seats in place; you could get a mid-size suitcase in here, although you will have to haul it high up over the tall sill.

Similarly, access to the cabin is quite a climb up and across the wide door sills. On to the seats, and at the front, you’ll be impressed at how well Tata has crafted the big chairs. The contrast-stitched faux leather feels suitably rich. The cushioning, which uses multi-density foam, is a touch too firm but has the bolstering just where you need it. Our only small grouse is the ‘lump’ around the H-point of the seat which, rather than adding to the support, feels like you’ve sat on your mobile phone. The thick A-pillar can initially cause a blind spot but you learn to look around it. The car’s size and the high driving position can be a little overwhelming until you get used to it.

If you want to replicate the comfort of the front seats in the middle row, you can do so on the top-spec XT trims of the Hexa with its two individual chairs. The only downside of these, apart from reducing the seating capacity to six, is that they don’t tumble forward and this limits maximum boot space; also, it’s easier to just walk between them to access the back row. A conventional split-folding bench comes as standard, but even here, accessing the third row isn’t easy. It has to be slid all the way back to tumble forward properly, and then too its immense weight makes it quite a task. Moreover, the Hexa’s huge rear wheel arches make access tricky, to begin with. Still, when in place, even the bench seat is really comfortable, supportive and spacious, although the middle passenger has a large central AC console to deal with. What does give you that ‘executive’ feeling in the middle row is the window shade that can be raised to keep the heat out quite effectively.

Finally, the third row – it’s quite a comfy place for two. The high floor chassis means you sit a bit knees-up of course, but it’s not as bad as some other ladder-frame SUVs. The advantage of the MPV-like squared-off rear is that head and shoulder room isn’t compromised in the third row. In fact, you can even recline the backrest, and there are also adjustable headrests. There are, of course, air-con vents for all three rows, but the blower is really quite loud, and when fully cranked up it, can overpower even the engine noise.

So, space and comfort are a highlight in the Hexa but you’ll agree that what really wows you about the interior is the quality of materials. It’s on a level thus far unseen from Tata Motors, and for once has a design to match. The dashboard isn’t a dull collection of flat surfaces anymore. The central stack has a variety of colours, textures and surfaces; here too, like with the exterior, excessive chrome has been substituted with other finishes, like piano black and dull grey plastics. Panel gaps are impressively few and even so, the dark colour scheme helps conceal them. The quality of the switchgear is also rather good (there are even knurled knobs and door locks), apart from a few places like the steering control buttons which feel tiny and fiddly to use. The upper glove box also has a terribly tricky-to-use unlock button for its latch.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

While the Hexa’s engine has been derived from the 2.2-litre unit seen in the Aria, in its Varicor 400 guise it has been extensively revamped. Girish Wagh, Sr Vice President, Product Planning at Tata Motors, explained that the block, head, intake and turbo systems have been revamped to deliver higher power and torque density and greater levels of refinement. The four-cylinder engine makes 156hp and 400Nm of torque which is channelised through a 6-speed manual or a 6-speed automatic. Upon start up, the engine feels reasonably quiet; although, getting going smoothly from standstill requires some getting used to as the light clutch has a very sudden bite. Also, considerable effort is required to change gears and slotting into fifth required plenty of guess work, too.

Easy drivability is a strength of this engine, with the turbo spooling up nice and early, letting you amble along in one gear. On the move you can haul the rev needle to the 4600rpm limiter if need be. The performance through that rev range is adequate, not exciting; no doubt, weighed down by the Hexa’s considerable 2280kg kerb weight. On the move the engine remains reasonably quiet till around 3200rpm.

Using Bosch’s ESP 9.0, the Hexa packs traction control, hill hold control and hill descent control. This combined with engine modes and on-demand all-wheel drive has allowed Tata Motors to offer drive modes – Auto, Dynamic, Comfort and Off-Road. For instance in Comfort, the sudden spike in torque is softened for a smoother drive experience, and the gentle responses are also used to help improve fuel efficiency. In Dynamic mode, the performance of the engine is unhindered and the ESP intervention is also delayed. While in other modes the all-wheel drive mode is engaged only when required with as much as 45 per cent of the torque being sent to the front wheels, in Off-road mode all four wheels get drive consistently. The ESP is also recalibrated in this mode to suit loose surfaces.

The combination that really impressed on our first drive was the one equipped with the automatic. The 6-speed gearbox, originally a GM design, makes the best of the engine character, shifting before the 3000rpm mark to make the experience all the more easy going. The shifts from the ‘box aren’t lightning quick, but in normal driving conditions it always seems to know what you want and hence feels natural to drive. In Sport mode the gearbox shifts down aggressively to keep the engine rpm in the 3-4000rpm range for maximum punch. You could even control the gear shifts by tapping the gear lever forward or back.

RIDE AND HANDLING ;

Hexa is offered in manual six-speed and automatic six-speed options. While the former comes with “Super Drive Modes” for surface-specific options, the automatic Hexa was tested for this review. And it was an absolute breeze.

The Hexa automatic offers a no-fuss, no-fancy drive with power coming up in a decently linear manner. No, it is not zippy but then, it would be unfair to expect a car this big to whizz around in city traffic. What is good though is that it moves in a leisurely enough manner in city traffic to ensure one doesn’t miss out on those important meetings.

Push the pedal harder and there is that slight sound of a muffled diesel gruff but on the whole, the Varicor 400 engine does a fantastic job of keeping itself composed. This and the extremely-well insulated cabin ensure that the crudeness of diesel experienced on most cars is disguised.

Where the Hexa does lag is in speeds well over three-digits. While getting there is no problem at all, the steering system sends back minor yet very noticeable vibrations – enough to make the slightly jittery driver even more jittery. This was experienced each time the car was taken well past 110kmph in this review.

SAFETY ;

The Hexa equipment list consists of six airbags, ESP, traction control, ABS with EBD, climate control with vents on all three rows, auto headlamps, rain sensing wipers, and reverse parking sensors with a camera. There’s also power mirrors with demister, cruise control, rear sun blinds, an eight-way adjustable driver’s seat (non-electric), a multi-function steering wheel, and a 5-inch touchscreen infotainment system with JBL speakers, to name a few.

It does miss out on features like powered seats and keyless go, which is a norm in the segment. There’s no sunroof either, which the rivals offer. In short, manual gearbox variants include XM and XT in six and seven seater options along with the choice of automatic transmissions called XMA and XTA. A 4×4 manual model is also available on the XT variant.

BOTTOMLINE ;

Has Tata done enough with the Hexa to let it succeed? We think so as this car has everything expected from a vehicle in the segment. It lacks things like keyless start, proper front storage spaces and is quite massive in terms of length- an issue that will pop up for parking space starved city dwellers. But on the positive side the feature list is comprehensive; it is quite spacious, has solid road presence and will let you go to most places without thinking twice. For the Hexa to now completely succeed Tata must price it in such a way that it undercuts its main rival- the Mahindra XUV500 variant-for-variant. Given the price range that we believe it will exist in, the Hexa is also a competitor for the range of D-segment sedans. Get On Road price of Tata Hexa from Tata Dealers in Hyderabad

 

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Audi Q5 Review & Test Drive

OVERVIEW ;

Positioned between the smallish Audi Q3 and the huge Audi Q7, the Q5 promises to be a great urban SUV. It can handle bad terrain, and won’t be too cumbersome to drive in traffic either. Also, given that it looks good too, Audi hasn’t had a problem with the competition either. Back on tarmac, it’s docile and boasts car-like dynamics.??While Porsche is readying the Macan (it will be priced higher than the Q5) and BMW has the X3 already, the Q5 enjoys its position, because of its capability as a product, and Audi’s well deserved value in the market.

EXTERIOR AND LOOK ;

The Audi Q5 comes up as a very subtle looking SUV. The overall design of it looks more coupe inspired than a typical SUV. The sloping roof lines, mild flares on the side with a longish bonnet make the Q5 look very suave in nature. The Q5 does not look like a typical in-your-face kind of a SUV but then it still has a bold look and looks contemporary.Having a family face, this one too has a single frame radiator grille which has been finished in gloss chrome. The vertical chrome struts look very neat. The three dimensionally finished bonnet flows very elegantly between the single frame grille to the front windshield making the design look very aerodynamic. The Xenon plus trapezoidal headlamps sweep back to the side.

The side profile is humble. The window lines have been done in chrome. The Audi Q5 measures 4629mm in length. That also translated to good interior space. This one gets a 10 spoke V shaped lightweight forged aluminum wheels and 235/60 R18 tyres. The combination of these two make the car look dynamic. The roof line drops very subtly and the lip of the roofline ends with a spoiler which makes it look sporty.The rear has wide spread tail lamps. The tail gate indeed gives it a distinct look and one can easily it’s an Audi you are following. The tail gate is indeed very practical and makes it very practical to load and unload. Hidden under the massive chunk of a rear bumper are the exhaust diffusers which have been done in brush Aluminum.

So, the new Q5 which recently got its dose of updates is a good looking SUV. It looks more like a big hatch and less of a SUV. The fact that the Q5 is selling in good numbers also assures that India has matured as a market in terms of taste and choice. So, the Q5 packs in cues from Big-Bro Q7 and still manages its own character. The daytime running LED lights of the Q5 are just an icing and looks simply awesome.

INTERIOR AND COMFORT ;

Perhaps even more vast a change than the exterior, the 2017 Q5’s interior gets huge update. It takes after Audi’s current design styling and features a low-hung, thin dashboard with its Virtual Cockpit gauge cluster, minimalist HVAC controls, and (oddly) tacked on infotainment screen. The center console also sports a new design that includes a new electronic gear shifter and track pad. The steering wheel takes after other Audi models, as well, and features a thin yet sculpted design. The hexagonal grille design is mirrored on the airbag cover, too.

In-dash technology includes Audi’s Virtual Cockpit with its 12.3-inch TFT screen and configurable digital gauges. The MMI infotainment screen perched above the center console offers 8.3-inches of viewing screen and is controlled by both touch and the large track pad just ahead of the shifter. The pad offers smartphone-like controls, with pinch-to-zoom and finger-writing to text capability. The system also features Audi’s Personal Route Assist, which learns your driving habits and can suggest alternate routs should traffic have your usual route blocked. Onboard LTE Wi-Fi allows the Q5 to be an online hotspot and there’s even a Qi wireless phone charger and integrated phone antenna to keep smartphone powered and connected. Audiophiles will appreciate the Bang & Olufsen Sound System with 3D sound.

Rear seats offer a good amount of legroom matched with lightly bolstered outboard seats and decent headroom. HVAC vents keep rear passengers happy on hot or cold days, and an optional rear seat entertainment package features two huge screens.The seats also fold flat, offering an impressive amount of cargo room. Audi says there’s 54.7 cubic feet of space with the seats stowed. With the second row in place, cargo room is cut down to 21.5 cubic feet of space. That’s does represent an improvement of 0.4 cubic feet of the last Q5.

ENGINE AND PERFORMANCE ;

We have already witnessed the 3.0-litre, V6 TDI diesel engine in the Audi A6 and Audi A7 earlier, but this motor just doesn’t cease to amaze us every single time. In the Q5, Audi has boosted the output by 5 BHP and 78 Nm, which is quite significant considering the added twist on offer. However the addition in power hasn’t come at the cost of economy and Audi claims that the new Q5 is up to 15 percent more efficient than its predecessor. Power delivery is instant and rewarding and NVH levels are very good with very little diesel grunt audible inside the luxurious cabin.

This engine is mated to a 7-spveed S tronic transmission which is at the forefront ensuring smooth cog swapping. There are no paddle shifts even on the top-end variant which comes as a disappointment, however one can take control of things by using the tiptronic function on the gear lever. Performance, as you would expect, is nothing short of explosive with every dab on the accelerator pedal resulting in an instantaneous surge ahead with plenty of reserve still left. Power delivery although linear, is still addictive and there is a definite shove in your knickers when you bury your right foot in the floor.

We can go endlessly with praise about the 3.0-litre TDI engine, it’s that darn good. The motor feels at home at all speeds, whether its ambling around the city, sprinting on open roads or simply cruising on the highways. This mill does a splendid job in hauling the 1.8 tonne Q5 with urgency and blurred scenery. The Audi drive select system offers various modes which control the accelerator pedal characteristics, automatic transmission shift points and amount of steering assist as well. How has Audi managed to boost performance and efficiency at the same time? The German car maker has reduced weight with the use of aluminum on the engine hood and tail gate. Whoever said ‘you can’t have your cake and eat it too’ was wrong, very wrong!

DRIVING DYNAMICS ;

Apart from the engines, the other thing that Audi did not have to do much to was the quattro all-wheel-drive system, which has widely grown to be accepted as one of the best traction aids in the market. The bit of fine-tuning they’ve done has resulted in smoother transitioning from the efficient front-wheel-drive set-up to the all-wheel drive, but can you and I tell the difference? Probably not. What you will notice, however, is the new multi-link suspension set-up with the optional air suspension which has made the ride quality and transfer of weight noticeably more pliant. You can feel the suspension complying with the quattro system more amicably when you chuck the car into corners, pretending it’s a low-slung sportscar. It’ll play pretend along with you, keeping things tidy and under control. What also helps is that the new chassis takes away 90kg from the Q5’s kerb which helps it behave on the road the way it does.

SAFETY AND SECURITY ;

It has a list of safety aspects including a central locking system, heat insulating glass, a windscreen cleaning system, movable sun visors, sun blinds, roof-edge spoiler and anti-theft alarm. It has an advanced immobilizer system, first aid kit with warning triangle, tyre pressure monitoring system, a collapsible spare wheel and ISOFIX child seat mounting.

CONCLUSSION ;

There are a lot of products in the market that shout for attention, displaying a probable lack of substance. The Audi Q5 is the exact opposite. It is quite capable but doesn’t give a clue about it, until you get behind the wheel.The simple but effective styling, the range of good engines, and a wide array of options makes the Audi Q5 so special. The 2.0TDI is the choice of the lot. It has a good amount of power, and doesn’t drink too much of fuel either. ?It’s comfortable and spacious inside as well, which means if you are going to be chauffeured around in one of these, you won’t have any problems either. Add the good amount of stability and safety options the vehicle offers, and you have a winner in your hands.

Audi Q5 30 Tdi Quattro Premium Ex-showroom Price is   50,59,500/- and On Road Price is   58,97,652/- in Bangalore. Audi Q5 30 Tdi Quattro Premium comes in 6 colours, namely Scuba Blue,Ibis White,Monsoon Grey,Teak Brown,Florett Silver,Mythos Black.For more details of Audi Cars click on to carzprize.com

 

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Mitsubishi Pajero Sport Review,Interiors,Mileages & Performance

OVERVIEW

Mitsubishi might be a pale shadow of its former self but their greatest hits back catalog still has some prized – and revered – name plates. Lancer, particularly when suffixed with Evolution, will get every petrol heads’ unwavering attention; rallyists in India will brook no trash-talk of the Cedia; and off-road enthusiasts still whisper Pajero in respectful tones. Yet nobody, not even enthusiasts, buy Mitsubishis anymore and the reason is simple: everything is dated, overpriced, burns the wrong fuel and have long since lost relevance to the Indian market.

However just when things looked beyond salvage the strongest nameplate in the cupboard has been dusted out, polished and given a fresh lease of life. The Pajero Sport, unlike what the name suggests, has nothing to do with the Pajero, Montero or all those Repsol-liveried, Ralliart-fettled, Dakar-conquering machines – this is a completely different SUV line designed for the rough and tumble of emerging markets. In fact the design, engineering and underlying ethos have more in common with the Toyota Fortuner than any other Mitsubishi. Like the Fortuner which is based on the Hilux pickup platform the Pajero Sport too shares its platform with the Triton pickup. And just like Toyota who have concentrated manufacturing of the Hilux, Fortuner and its derivatives in Thailand (not Japan) to keep costs in check so too is Thailand the mother plant for the Pajero Sport from where completely built up units will be initially imported with CKD operations set to commence in Chennai from September.

EXTERIORS

Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is built on the platform of company’s light pick-up trucks which are sold in bulk in Thailand. In fact, the company designers have lifted the nose structure as it is from its rally car, the Pajero Evo. The Chrome plated vertical bar type front grille is integrated adjacently with the projector beam headlamps which come with a functionality of self-leveling. The fog lamps right under the headlamps is a big turn on. The enormous wheel arches on both sides that have 17×7.5 JJ Alloy wheels; go well with the overall front fascia of the SUV.

Beneath the front bumper, there is plenty of space due to the enlarged ground clearance of 215mm in the SUV. The Japanese auto-major has executed chrome pretty well with certain sections of the SUV like the chrome-plated power door mirrors and door handles strike the right chord and provide a bit of much needed sophistication and plushness to the SUV unlikely of its stony exterior appearance. Additionally, black roof rails, high-mounted stop lamp at rear, chrome-plated rear license plate garnish, colour-keyed side protector mouldings, etc. are like icing on the cake.

INTERIORS

Open the heavy door and climb into the car and you will appreciate the build quality of this vehicle, the Pajero Sport showing a lot of solidity. When you close the door, there is a massive thud too and quality levels are very good. The dashboard is nice but there are just too many colours on it, the dash is a dual-tone black and beige unit while the centre console gets wood finish and the centre AC vents gets a silver surrounding. There is no digital climate control on this Mitsubishi which is shocking of course but there is decent amount of kit on offer like projector headlights (for the low beam only), puddle lamps on each door, illuminated key ring, electric driver seat adjustment, leather seats, rear parking sensors, reverse camera, Bluetooth connectivity and a touch-screen audio system with Navigation along with the usual iPod, USB, AUX and CD options. Right above the infotainment screen is a multi-information display (not in the instrument cluster) which displays average speed, fuel efficiency, range, date, outside temperate and elevation.

Somethings do look like an after thought in this cabin, like the mic for the Bluetooth and the speaker for the same, it’s exposed, both the mic and the speaker making this look like an after market job. There are plenty of storage bins inside the cabin, the glovebox has good depth (although it isn’t much wide) and it gets a lock too. Other storage areas include a box below the AC controls on the centre console, under the front centre arm rest, two cupholders next to the handbrake, sunglass holder on the roof but there is no magazine pocket behind the driver’s seat. The door pockets are a tad small and 1-litre bottles will be a tight fit on the front doors while the rear doors have been shaped in a way (have an inward scoop) that they can easily take a litre sized bottle.

The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport has comfortable seats which coupled with the airy cabin (due to large windows and beige seats) makes this car a nice place to be in for long journeys. The front two rows are high on comfort with the middle row having ample legroom too, it also gets coat hooks next to the grab rails. Under thigh support isn’t a problem in the first row but a bit lacking in the second row and very bad in the last row, where you have to naturally climb in to get in. While headroom is good all throughout, the last row only has average legroom, making it best for children. There is a slight hump in the floor in the second row and there are only two headrests in this row, so it’s best used by two people, making the Pajero Sport a good four seater. Cup holders and storage space is on the right side in the last row. The AC vents are roof mounted and controls are placed in the second row but the master AC switch for the rear is placed too low and out of sight on the dashboard. Boot space is lacking with all three rows up but you can flip forward the second row and flat fold the third row completely to boost luggage space. There is also a power socket in the boot.

PERFORMANCE

This model series is available with a commanding 2.5-litre diesel mill that has the displacement capacity of 2477cc. It is based on a double overhead camshaft valve configuration. It has four cylinders that are further fitted with sixteen valves. This mill is integrated with a common rail direct injection system that helps in returning a decent fuel economy. This intercooled turbocharged power plant enables it to pump out a maximum power of 175.56bhp at 4000rpm, which is quite good. At the same time, it yields a peak torque output of 400Nm in the range of 2000 to 2500rpm, which is rather good considering the road and traffic conditions in India. This vehicle is offered with a two gear box options for the customers to select from, which are five speed manual as well as automatic transmission gear box that makes gear shifting quite easier.

The automaker is offering this model series with the same diesel power plant that has a common rail fuel injection technology. It is currently available with both manual and automatic transmission gearbox options for the buyers to choose from. Its manual version has the ability to produce a maximum mileage of 13.5 Kmpl on highways, which goes down to a minimum of 11.5 Kmpl under city traffic conditions. However, its automatic version can deliver a mileage in the range of 10 to 12 Kmpl.Its diesel engine comprises of 4-cylinders that further have 16-valves and is based on a DOHC valve configuration. Both the manual and automatic versions have the ability to produce a maximum power of 175.56bhp that yields a commanding torque output of 400NM, which is rather good.

DRIVING DYNAMICS

The 4×4 vehicle with manual gearbox reaches up to100 kmph speed within just 11 seconds and clocks a maximum speed in the range of 190 to 195 Kmph. The manual variant returns a mileage of 13.5 kmpl on highways and around 11.5 kmpl in city traffic conditions. On the contrary, 4×2 version with 5-speed automatic gearbox has the capacity of breaching 100 kmph speed mark within just 12 seconds and reach up to a peak speed of 190 Kmph. This variant offers a mileage within the range of 10 to 12 kmpl.

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This giant vehicle is equipped with a reliable suspension system that ensures maximum stability and balance on any road conditions. The front axle is integrated with a double wishbone while the rear one is fitted with a 3-link coil spring type of system. In order to avoid uneven road jerks, this car is loaded with stabilizer bars.Further, 16-inche ventilated disc brakes are mounted on the front wheels, which are hydraulically operated with two circuits. The rear wheels are equipped with a set of 16-inche ventilated drum-in-disc brakes, which are hydraulically operated with split brake. All these features ensure prompt and enhanced braking experience. Not just these, Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) and Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) are featured in this variant for enriched braking mechanism. This utility vehicle is loaded with a torsion-resistant rigid ladder frame for enhanced stability and ‘With on-demand 4WD’ for sure traction. The beams provide added protection to the occupants in case of collision.

SAFETY

The automaker has loaded this sports utility vehicle with many vital aspects that will offer protection to all its passengers and the vehicle as well. There are dual front SRS (supplemental restraint system) airbags offered, which minimizes the injury in the event of a collision. Its has an extra strong body construction that is built using high tensile steel at crucial locations, which makes it rigid. Another aspects is the electronic engine immobilizer, which prevents any unauthorized entry into the vehicle and protects it from theft. It also includes side impact protection beams and crumple zones, which helps it to absorb jolts caused in case of a collision. This vehicle is integrated with several advanced features like an anti lock braking system with electronic brake force distribution, three point ELR seat belts, collapsible steering column and anti intrusion brake pedals that further enhances the level of security.

VERDICT

The Mitsubishi Pajero Sport is by far the most under-rated vehicle in its class. Sure there are issues with the way Mitsubishi and its laid back partner, Hindustan Motors has gone about handling business in the country but as a product, the Pajero Sport is a fine vehicle, deserving much applaud. This vehicle is very well engineered, packs in a lot of comfort and has a visual appeal that shouts SUV. With a good diesel engine under its belly and a terrific ride quality, the Pajero Sport comes across as an excellent alternative in the segment, the automatic version only broadening this two ton vehicle’s appeal even further.

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